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Contradictions, negotiations and reform: The story of left policy transition in West Bengal

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Contradictions, negotiations and reform : The story of left policy transition in West Bengal. / Das, R.; Mahmood, Zaad.

In: Journal of South Asian Development, Vol. 10, No. 2, 01.08.2015, p. 199-229.

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Das, R. ; Mahmood, Zaad. / Contradictions, negotiations and reform : The story of left policy transition in West Bengal. In: Journal of South Asian Development. 2015 ; Vol. 10, No. 2. pp. 199-229.

Bibtex

@article{ec176d14b31549f3a073917cdc02b9b3,
title = "Contradictions, negotiations and reform: The story of left policy transition in West Bengal",
abstract = "This article provides a historical perspective on a rather unique chapter in the era of economic reforms in India—the case of the state of West Bengal. In 1991, the Government of India began to pursue a policy of economic liberalization, causing serious political challenges for the Communist Party of India-Marxist (CPIM)-led Left Front coalition in West Bengal. Historically, the CPIM had strongly opposed economic reforms, but was compelled to undertake a policy {\textquoteleft}transition{\textquoteright} owing to the stagnating economy of the state. The transition, and the motivations behind it, was a topic debated often—especially once the party started courting private investment, pushed for large-scale industrialization, and eventually suffered a historic defeat in 2011 after 33 years in power—but rarely has a coherent historical narrative of what caused the transition been brought to the forefront. This article attempts to address that gap by examining the following question: what were the local political conditions that compelled the CPIM/Left Front take upon itself the task of engineering such a transition? While acknowledging the larger forces of globalization and Indian federalism, the analysis focuses on the rarely discussed local socio-economic priorities in West Bengal, and constructs a dual narrative of instrumental and political–ideological arguments. ",
keywords = "India, West Bengal, Left Front, CPIM, Industrial policy, Jyoti Basu",
author = "R. Das and Zaad Mahmood",
note = "The final, definitive version of this paper has been published in Journal of South Asian Development, 10(2), Aug 2015 by SAGE Publications Ltd, All rights reserved. {\textcopyright} [The Author(s)]",
year = "2015",
month = aug,
day = "1",
doi = "10.1177/0972150915591392",
language = "English",
volume = "10",
pages = "199--229",
journal = "Journal of South Asian Development",
issn = "0973-1741",
publisher = "SAGE Publications Inc.",
number = "2",

}

RIS

TY - JOUR

T1 - Contradictions, negotiations and reform

T2 - The story of left policy transition in West Bengal

AU - Das, R.

AU - Mahmood, Zaad

N1 - The final, definitive version of this paper has been published in Journal of South Asian Development, 10(2), Aug 2015 by SAGE Publications Ltd, All rights reserved. © [The Author(s)]

PY - 2015/8/1

Y1 - 2015/8/1

N2 - This article provides a historical perspective on a rather unique chapter in the era of economic reforms in India—the case of the state of West Bengal. In 1991, the Government of India began to pursue a policy of economic liberalization, causing serious political challenges for the Communist Party of India-Marxist (CPIM)-led Left Front coalition in West Bengal. Historically, the CPIM had strongly opposed economic reforms, but was compelled to undertake a policy ‘transition’ owing to the stagnating economy of the state. The transition, and the motivations behind it, was a topic debated often—especially once the party started courting private investment, pushed for large-scale industrialization, and eventually suffered a historic defeat in 2011 after 33 years in power—but rarely has a coherent historical narrative of what caused the transition been brought to the forefront. This article attempts to address that gap by examining the following question: what were the local political conditions that compelled the CPIM/Left Front take upon itself the task of engineering such a transition? While acknowledging the larger forces of globalization and Indian federalism, the analysis focuses on the rarely discussed local socio-economic priorities in West Bengal, and constructs a dual narrative of instrumental and political–ideological arguments.

AB - This article provides a historical perspective on a rather unique chapter in the era of economic reforms in India—the case of the state of West Bengal. In 1991, the Government of India began to pursue a policy of economic liberalization, causing serious political challenges for the Communist Party of India-Marxist (CPIM)-led Left Front coalition in West Bengal. Historically, the CPIM had strongly opposed economic reforms, but was compelled to undertake a policy ‘transition’ owing to the stagnating economy of the state. The transition, and the motivations behind it, was a topic debated often—especially once the party started courting private investment, pushed for large-scale industrialization, and eventually suffered a historic defeat in 2011 after 33 years in power—but rarely has a coherent historical narrative of what caused the transition been brought to the forefront. This article attempts to address that gap by examining the following question: what were the local political conditions that compelled the CPIM/Left Front take upon itself the task of engineering such a transition? While acknowledging the larger forces of globalization and Indian federalism, the analysis focuses on the rarely discussed local socio-economic priorities in West Bengal, and constructs a dual narrative of instrumental and political–ideological arguments.

KW - India

KW - West Bengal

KW - Left Front

KW - CPIM

KW - Industrial policy

KW - Jyoti Basu

U2 - 10.1177/0972150915591392

DO - 10.1177/0972150915591392

M3 - Article

VL - 10

SP - 199

EP - 229

JO - Journal of South Asian Development

JF - Journal of South Asian Development

SN - 0973-1741

IS - 2

ER -

ID: 2972340