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"Delinquent boys": Toward a new understanding of "deviant" and transgressive behavior in gay men.

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"Delinquent boys" : Toward a new understanding of "deviant" and transgressive behavior in gay men. / Frederick, Brian Jay.

In: Critical Criminology, Vol. 22, No. 1, 03.2014, p. 139-149.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

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@article{6ce88e191bc0405293f8d40bd8be8be4,
title = "{"}Delinquent boys{"}: Toward a new understanding of {"}deviant{"} and transgressive behavior in gay men.",
abstract = "Cultural criminology suggests that crime, deviance, and transgression are often subcultural in nature. For this reason, cultural criminologists often focus on the simultaneous forces of cultural inclusion and social exclusion when explaining criminal, deviant, or transgressive behaviors. This is a particularly useful bricolage for examining contemporary gay deviance and transgression—behaviors that are perhaps closely linked to (if not directly caused by) the past isolation, marginalization and/or oppression of homosexuals by Western heteronormative societies. It is also useful for understanding behaviors that are the result of marginalization and oppression from other sources, namely, the gay community itself. Using subcultural theories of deviance—such as those favored by cultural criminologists—this article explores a perspective that can be used for exploring certain forms of gay deviance and transgression. First, some of the more ostensible criminological theories that satisfy a prima facie criminological inquiry will be presented and critiqued: labeling and stigma, and resistance to heteronormativity. To these will be added a new and potentially productive way of thinking that takes into consideration rule-breaking as a form of resistance to homonormative norms, values and rules.",
keywords = "Criminology, LGBT sexualities, Drugs, Stigma, Marginalisation, sex",
author = "Frederick, {Brian Jay}",
note = "This project has been funded, in part, with support from the European Commission. This publication reflects the views only of the authors, and the Commission cannot be held responsible for any use which may be made of the information contained therein.",
year = "2014",
month = mar,
doi = "10.1007/s10612-013-9230-3",
language = "English",
volume = "22",
pages = "139--149",
journal = "Critical Criminology",
issn = "1205-8629",
publisher = "Springer Netherlands",
number = "1",

}

RIS

TY - JOUR

T1 - "Delinquent boys"

T2 - Toward a new understanding of "deviant" and transgressive behavior in gay men.

AU - Frederick, Brian Jay

N1 - This project has been funded, in part, with support from the European Commission. This publication reflects the views only of the authors, and the Commission cannot be held responsible for any use which may be made of the information contained therein.

PY - 2014/3

Y1 - 2014/3

N2 - Cultural criminology suggests that crime, deviance, and transgression are often subcultural in nature. For this reason, cultural criminologists often focus on the simultaneous forces of cultural inclusion and social exclusion when explaining criminal, deviant, or transgressive behaviors. This is a particularly useful bricolage for examining contemporary gay deviance and transgression—behaviors that are perhaps closely linked to (if not directly caused by) the past isolation, marginalization and/or oppression of homosexuals by Western heteronormative societies. It is also useful for understanding behaviors that are the result of marginalization and oppression from other sources, namely, the gay community itself. Using subcultural theories of deviance—such as those favored by cultural criminologists—this article explores a perspective that can be used for exploring certain forms of gay deviance and transgression. First, some of the more ostensible criminological theories that satisfy a prima facie criminological inquiry will be presented and critiqued: labeling and stigma, and resistance to heteronormativity. To these will be added a new and potentially productive way of thinking that takes into consideration rule-breaking as a form of resistance to homonormative norms, values and rules.

AB - Cultural criminology suggests that crime, deviance, and transgression are often subcultural in nature. For this reason, cultural criminologists often focus on the simultaneous forces of cultural inclusion and social exclusion when explaining criminal, deviant, or transgressive behaviors. This is a particularly useful bricolage for examining contemporary gay deviance and transgression—behaviors that are perhaps closely linked to (if not directly caused by) the past isolation, marginalization and/or oppression of homosexuals by Western heteronormative societies. It is also useful for understanding behaviors that are the result of marginalization and oppression from other sources, namely, the gay community itself. Using subcultural theories of deviance—such as those favored by cultural criminologists—this article explores a perspective that can be used for exploring certain forms of gay deviance and transgression. First, some of the more ostensible criminological theories that satisfy a prima facie criminological inquiry will be presented and critiqued: labeling and stigma, and resistance to heteronormativity. To these will be added a new and potentially productive way of thinking that takes into consideration rule-breaking as a form of resistance to homonormative norms, values and rules.

KW - Criminology

KW - LGBT sexualities

KW - Drugs

KW - Stigma

KW - Marginalisation

KW - sex

UR - https://link.springer.com/journal/10612/22/1

U2 - 10.1007/s10612-013-9230-3

DO - 10.1007/s10612-013-9230-3

M3 - Article

VL - 22

SP - 139

EP - 149

JO - Critical Criminology

JF - Critical Criminology

SN - 1205-8629

IS - 1

ER -

ID: 21809952