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Developing the multidimensional visual scale assessing affect, anxiety, pride, and energy through a research partnership with autistic scholars

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Developing the multidimensional visual scale assessing affect, anxiety, pride, and energy through a research partnership with autistic scholars. / Riccio, Ariana; Delos Santos, Jin; Kapp, Steven K.; Jordan, Allison; Denigris, Danielle; Gillespie-Lynch, Kristen.

In: Autism in Adulthood, 28.02.2020.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

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Riccio, Ariana ; Delos Santos, Jin ; Kapp, Steven K. ; Jordan, Allison ; Denigris, Danielle ; Gillespie-Lynch, Kristen. / Developing the multidimensional visual scale assessing affect, anxiety, pride, and energy through a research partnership with autistic scholars. In: Autism in Adulthood. 2020.

Bibtex

@article{875d0189aeed4dddbcac2f99b0917586,
title = "Developing the multidimensional visual scale assessing affect, anxiety, pride, and energy through a research partnership with autistic scholars",
abstract = "Autism research studies have traditionally failed to represent the full diversity of the autism spectrum due to the lack of measures available for use with participants who prefer to express themselves visually. A multidimensional measure of emotions, which can include both picture- and text-based prompts, may improve accessibility of emotion rating measures and broaden participation in research and educational evaluations to include those who communicate in diverse ways. Picture-based measures designed to assess participants' emotions may be useful for research concerning autistic identity and service evaluation, two areas where representation of diverse perspectives is needed. Our participatory group of autistic and nonautistic researchers developed a Multidimensional Visual Scale Assessing Affect, Anxiety, Pride, and Energy (AAPE) by adapting and expanding upon an existing emotion rating scale. When testing the AAPE with autistic college students (n = 72), their open-ended responses indicated that the AAPE's dimensions of affect (97.2% correct), anxiety (79.2% correct), and energy (84.7% correct) were well comprehended without text-based labels with potential for improvement in how pride (52.8% correct) was represented. When provided with the labels that each dimension was intended to represent, participants generally agreed that each emotional dimension was well represented. When tested in an informal educational summer camp with autistic children and adolescents (n = 50), the AAPE was well received and revealed insights about the students' emotional responses to different instructional strategies that can guide curricular improvements. The AAPE has utility as a tool to help diverse autistic individuals self-advocate and improve research and services.",
keywords = "emotion, measurement, visual scale, participatory research, autistic identity",
author = "Ariana Riccio and {Delos Santos}, Jin and Kapp, {Steven K.} and Allison Jordan and Danielle Denigris and Kristen Gillespie-Lynch",
year = "2020",
month = feb,
day = "28",
doi = "10.1089/aut.2019.0067",
language = "English",
journal = "Autism in Adulthood",
issn = "2573-9581",
publisher = "Mary Ann Liebert Inc.",

}

RIS

TY - JOUR

T1 - Developing the multidimensional visual scale assessing affect, anxiety, pride, and energy through a research partnership with autistic scholars

AU - Riccio, Ariana

AU - Delos Santos, Jin

AU - Kapp, Steven K.

AU - Jordan, Allison

AU - Denigris, Danielle

AU - Gillespie-Lynch, Kristen

PY - 2020/2/28

Y1 - 2020/2/28

N2 - Autism research studies have traditionally failed to represent the full diversity of the autism spectrum due to the lack of measures available for use with participants who prefer to express themselves visually. A multidimensional measure of emotions, which can include both picture- and text-based prompts, may improve accessibility of emotion rating measures and broaden participation in research and educational evaluations to include those who communicate in diverse ways. Picture-based measures designed to assess participants' emotions may be useful for research concerning autistic identity and service evaluation, two areas where representation of diverse perspectives is needed. Our participatory group of autistic and nonautistic researchers developed a Multidimensional Visual Scale Assessing Affect, Anxiety, Pride, and Energy (AAPE) by adapting and expanding upon an existing emotion rating scale. When testing the AAPE with autistic college students (n = 72), their open-ended responses indicated that the AAPE's dimensions of affect (97.2% correct), anxiety (79.2% correct), and energy (84.7% correct) were well comprehended without text-based labels with potential for improvement in how pride (52.8% correct) was represented. When provided with the labels that each dimension was intended to represent, participants generally agreed that each emotional dimension was well represented. When tested in an informal educational summer camp with autistic children and adolescents (n = 50), the AAPE was well received and revealed insights about the students' emotional responses to different instructional strategies that can guide curricular improvements. The AAPE has utility as a tool to help diverse autistic individuals self-advocate and improve research and services.

AB - Autism research studies have traditionally failed to represent the full diversity of the autism spectrum due to the lack of measures available for use with participants who prefer to express themselves visually. A multidimensional measure of emotions, which can include both picture- and text-based prompts, may improve accessibility of emotion rating measures and broaden participation in research and educational evaluations to include those who communicate in diverse ways. Picture-based measures designed to assess participants' emotions may be useful for research concerning autistic identity and service evaluation, two areas where representation of diverse perspectives is needed. Our participatory group of autistic and nonautistic researchers developed a Multidimensional Visual Scale Assessing Affect, Anxiety, Pride, and Energy (AAPE) by adapting and expanding upon an existing emotion rating scale. When testing the AAPE with autistic college students (n = 72), their open-ended responses indicated that the AAPE's dimensions of affect (97.2% correct), anxiety (79.2% correct), and energy (84.7% correct) were well comprehended without text-based labels with potential for improvement in how pride (52.8% correct) was represented. When provided with the labels that each dimension was intended to represent, participants generally agreed that each emotional dimension was well represented. When tested in an informal educational summer camp with autistic children and adolescents (n = 50), the AAPE was well received and revealed insights about the students' emotional responses to different instructional strategies that can guide curricular improvements. The AAPE has utility as a tool to help diverse autistic individuals self-advocate and improve research and services.

KW - emotion

KW - measurement

KW - visual scale

KW - participatory research

KW - autistic identity

U2 - 10.1089/aut.2019.0067

DO - 10.1089/aut.2019.0067

M3 - Article

JO - Autism in Adulthood

JF - Autism in Adulthood

SN - 2573-9581

ER -

ID: 19458208