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Development of self-recognition in chimpanzees (Pan troglodytes)

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

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Development of self-recognition in chimpanzees (Pan troglodytes). / Lin, A; Bard, Kim; Anderson, J.

In: Journal of Comparative Psychology, Vol. 106, No. 2, 06.1992, p. 120-127.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Harvard

Lin, A, Bard, K & Anderson, J 1992, 'Development of self-recognition in chimpanzees (Pan troglodytes)', Journal of Comparative Psychology, vol. 106, no. 2, pp. 120-127.

APA

Lin, A., Bard, K., & Anderson, J. (1992). Development of self-recognition in chimpanzees (Pan troglodytes). Journal of Comparative Psychology, 106(2), 120-127.

Vancouver

Lin A, Bard K, Anderson J. Development of self-recognition in chimpanzees (Pan troglodytes). Journal of Comparative Psychology. 1992 Jun;106(2):120-127.

Author

Lin, A ; Bard, Kim ; Anderson, J. / Development of self-recognition in chimpanzees (Pan troglodytes). In: Journal of Comparative Psychology. 1992 ; Vol. 106, No. 2. pp. 120-127.

Bibtex

@article{6365081756c34ba091410ffd5e060c63,
title = "Development of self-recognition in chimpanzees (Pan troglodytes)",
abstract = "Chimpanzees (Pan troglodytes) demonstrate the ability to recognize themselves in mirrors, yet investigations of the development of self-recognition in chimpanzees are sparse. Twelve young chimpanzees, grouped by age, were given mirror exposure and tested for self-recognition and contingent movement. All 6 juveniles, 4 and 5 years old, exhibited mirror-guided, mark-directed behavior and clear evidence of self-recognition. In contrast, among the infants, only the oldest group of 2'/2-year-olds exhibited clear evidence of self-recognition. All chimpanzees exhibited both self-directed behaviors and contingent movements. These results suggest that self-recognition occurs at a slightly older age in chimpanzees than in human infants. In humans, self-recognition is linked with other cognitive abilities. The results conform to the general pattern that great apes exhibit many cognitive skills comparable to those of 2-year-old humans.",
author = "A Lin and Kim Bard and J. Anderson",
year = "1992",
month = jun,
language = "English",
volume = "106",
pages = "120--127",
journal = "Journal of Comparative Psychology",
issn = "0889-3667",
publisher = "American Psychological Association",
number = "2",

}

RIS

TY - JOUR

T1 - Development of self-recognition in chimpanzees (Pan troglodytes)

AU - Lin, A

AU - Bard, Kim

AU - Anderson, J.

PY - 1992/6

Y1 - 1992/6

N2 - Chimpanzees (Pan troglodytes) demonstrate the ability to recognize themselves in mirrors, yet investigations of the development of self-recognition in chimpanzees are sparse. Twelve young chimpanzees, grouped by age, were given mirror exposure and tested for self-recognition and contingent movement. All 6 juveniles, 4 and 5 years old, exhibited mirror-guided, mark-directed behavior and clear evidence of self-recognition. In contrast, among the infants, only the oldest group of 2'/2-year-olds exhibited clear evidence of self-recognition. All chimpanzees exhibited both self-directed behaviors and contingent movements. These results suggest that self-recognition occurs at a slightly older age in chimpanzees than in human infants. In humans, self-recognition is linked with other cognitive abilities. The results conform to the general pattern that great apes exhibit many cognitive skills comparable to those of 2-year-old humans.

AB - Chimpanzees (Pan troglodytes) demonstrate the ability to recognize themselves in mirrors, yet investigations of the development of self-recognition in chimpanzees are sparse. Twelve young chimpanzees, grouped by age, were given mirror exposure and tested for self-recognition and contingent movement. All 6 juveniles, 4 and 5 years old, exhibited mirror-guided, mark-directed behavior and clear evidence of self-recognition. In contrast, among the infants, only the oldest group of 2'/2-year-olds exhibited clear evidence of self-recognition. All chimpanzees exhibited both self-directed behaviors and contingent movements. These results suggest that self-recognition occurs at a slightly older age in chimpanzees than in human infants. In humans, self-recognition is linked with other cognitive abilities. The results conform to the general pattern that great apes exhibit many cognitive skills comparable to those of 2-year-old humans.

M3 - Article

VL - 106

SP - 120

EP - 127

JO - Journal of Comparative Psychology

JF - Journal of Comparative Psychology

SN - 0889-3667

IS - 2

ER -

ID: 217884