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Editorial: fraud, corruption and the financial crisis

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Editorial: fraud, corruption and the financial crisis. / Button, Mark.

In: International Journal of Law, Crime and Justice, Vol. 39, No. 3, 09.2011, p. 137-139.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Harvard

Button, M 2011, 'Editorial: fraud, corruption and the financial crisis', International Journal of Law, Crime and Justice, vol. 39, no. 3, pp. 137-139. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.ijlcj.2011.05.005

APA

Button, M. (2011). Editorial: fraud, corruption and the financial crisis. International Journal of Law, Crime and Justice, 39(3), 137-139. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.ijlcj.2011.05.005

Vancouver

Button M. Editorial: fraud, corruption and the financial crisis. International Journal of Law, Crime and Justice. 2011 Sep;39(3):137-139. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.ijlcj.2011.05.005

Author

Button, Mark. / Editorial: fraud, corruption and the financial crisis. In: International Journal of Law, Crime and Justice. 2011 ; Vol. 39, No. 3. pp. 137-139.

Bibtex

@article{caff47fb51744c95bb51bb1cfc44bc85,
title = "Editorial: fraud, corruption and the financial crisis",
abstract = "As the UK begins to emerge from one of the worst recessions since the Second World War it would seem many have forgotten some of the causes of it. The sub-prime mortgage sector in the USA has been attributed as a significant contributor to the crisis and the problems in this sector in the USA can be linked to fraud and corruption, as one of the major causes. From applicants fabricating false information to brokers exaggerating their clients prospects without them knowing, to ultimately a system of mortgages which was certainly built upon negligence if not a great deal of fraud1, this all culminated to creating a growth in mortgages, which were doomed for default (Bitner, 2008; Ferguson, 2008). The cost of the Global Financial Crisis of 2008e09 has been estimated at, $11.9 trillion by the International Monetary Fund (IMF), or, in plain terms, one-fifth of annual global world output illustrates the damage not tackling fraud seriously can do (Daily Telegraph, 2009).",
author = "Mark Button",
year = "2011",
month = "9",
doi = "10.1016/j.ijlcj.2011.05.005",
language = "English",
volume = "39",
pages = "137--139",
journal = "International Journal of Law, Crime and Justice",
issn = "1756-0616",
publisher = "Academic Press Inc.",
number = "3",

}

RIS

TY - JOUR

T1 - Editorial: fraud, corruption and the financial crisis

AU - Button, Mark

PY - 2011/9

Y1 - 2011/9

N2 - As the UK begins to emerge from one of the worst recessions since the Second World War it would seem many have forgotten some of the causes of it. The sub-prime mortgage sector in the USA has been attributed as a significant contributor to the crisis and the problems in this sector in the USA can be linked to fraud and corruption, as one of the major causes. From applicants fabricating false information to brokers exaggerating their clients prospects without them knowing, to ultimately a system of mortgages which was certainly built upon negligence if not a great deal of fraud1, this all culminated to creating a growth in mortgages, which were doomed for default (Bitner, 2008; Ferguson, 2008). The cost of the Global Financial Crisis of 2008e09 has been estimated at, $11.9 trillion by the International Monetary Fund (IMF), or, in plain terms, one-fifth of annual global world output illustrates the damage not tackling fraud seriously can do (Daily Telegraph, 2009).

AB - As the UK begins to emerge from one of the worst recessions since the Second World War it would seem many have forgotten some of the causes of it. The sub-prime mortgage sector in the USA has been attributed as a significant contributor to the crisis and the problems in this sector in the USA can be linked to fraud and corruption, as one of the major causes. From applicants fabricating false information to brokers exaggerating their clients prospects without them knowing, to ultimately a system of mortgages which was certainly built upon negligence if not a great deal of fraud1, this all culminated to creating a growth in mortgages, which were doomed for default (Bitner, 2008; Ferguson, 2008). The cost of the Global Financial Crisis of 2008e09 has been estimated at, $11.9 trillion by the International Monetary Fund (IMF), or, in plain terms, one-fifth of annual global world output illustrates the damage not tackling fraud seriously can do (Daily Telegraph, 2009).

U2 - 10.1016/j.ijlcj.2011.05.005

DO - 10.1016/j.ijlcj.2011.05.005

M3 - Article

VL - 39

SP - 137

EP - 139

JO - International Journal of Law, Crime and Justice

JF - International Journal of Law, Crime and Justice

SN - 1756-0616

IS - 3

ER -

ID: 171833