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Exercise self-efficacy correlates in people with psychosis

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Exercise self-efficacy correlates in people with psychosis. / Vancampfort, Davy; Gorczynski, Paul; De Hert, Marc; Probst, Michel; Naisiga, Annetie; Basangwa, David; Mugisha, James.

In: Psychiatry Research, 08.09.2017.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Harvard

Vancampfort, D, Gorczynski, P, De Hert, M, Probst, M, Naisiga, A, Basangwa, D & Mugisha, J 2017, 'Exercise self-efficacy correlates in people with psychosis' Psychiatry Research. DOI: 10.1016/j.psychres.2017.08.095

APA

Vancampfort, D., Gorczynski, P., De Hert, M., Probst, M., Naisiga, A., Basangwa, D., & Mugisha, J. (2017). Exercise self-efficacy correlates in people with psychosis. Psychiatry Research. DOI: 10.1016/j.psychres.2017.08.095

Vancouver

Vancampfort D, Gorczynski P, De Hert M, Probst M, Naisiga A, Basangwa D et al. Exercise self-efficacy correlates in people with psychosis. Psychiatry Research. 2017 Sep 8. Available from, DOI: 10.1016/j.psychres.2017.08.095

Author

Vancampfort, Davy; Gorczynski, Paul; De Hert, Marc; Probst, Michel; Naisiga, Annetie; Basangwa, David; Mugisha, James / Exercise self-efficacy correlates in people with psychosis.

In: Psychiatry Research, 08.09.2017.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Bibtex

@article{f225fd7de59a499e98c54b887df88428,
title = "Exercise self-efficacy correlates in people with psychosis",
abstract = "Despite the recognition of the importance of exercise self-efficacy in exercise adoption and maintenance, previous investigations on exercise self-efficacy in people with psychosis is scarce. The present study aimed to (1) explore if exercise self-efficacy differed between stages of behavior change in Ugandan outpatients with psychosis, and (2) assess sociodemographic, clinical and motivational correlates of exercise self-efficacy. In total, 48 patients (24 women) completed the Exercise Self-Efficacy Scale (ESES), the Patient-centered Assessment and Counseling for Exercise questionnaire, the Brief Symptoms Inventory-18 (BSI-18), and questions pertaining to intrinsic motivation in the Behavioral Regulation in Exercise Questionnaire-2. Additionally, participants were asked about their exercise behavior in the past 7 days and screened for cardio-metabolic risk factors. Higher ESES-scores were observed in those in the maintenance (n=17) versus those in the pre-action stage (n=17) of behavior change. Higher ESES-scores were also significantly associated with lower BSI-18 somatization and higher intrinsic motivation scores. Our data indicated that health care professionals should assist patients with psychosis in interpreting physiological states during exercise. Future research should explore whether bolstering such sources of information might directly or indirectly effect exercise self-efficacy.",
keywords = "exercise, physical activity, psychosis, self-efficacy",
author = "Davy Vancampfort and Paul Gorczynski and {De Hert}, Marc and Michel Probst and Annetie Naisiga and David Basangwa and James Mugisha",
year = "2017",
month = "9",
doi = "10.1016/j.psychres.2017.08.095",
journal = "Psychiatry Research",
issn = "0165-1781",
publisher = "Elsevier Ireland Ltd",

}

RIS

TY - JOUR

T1 - Exercise self-efficacy correlates in people with psychosis

AU - Vancampfort,Davy

AU - Gorczynski,Paul

AU - De Hert,Marc

AU - Probst,Michel

AU - Naisiga,Annetie

AU - Basangwa,David

AU - Mugisha,James

PY - 2017/9/8

Y1 - 2017/9/8

N2 - Despite the recognition of the importance of exercise self-efficacy in exercise adoption and maintenance, previous investigations on exercise self-efficacy in people with psychosis is scarce. The present study aimed to (1) explore if exercise self-efficacy differed between stages of behavior change in Ugandan outpatients with psychosis, and (2) assess sociodemographic, clinical and motivational correlates of exercise self-efficacy. In total, 48 patients (24 women) completed the Exercise Self-Efficacy Scale (ESES), the Patient-centered Assessment and Counseling for Exercise questionnaire, the Brief Symptoms Inventory-18 (BSI-18), and questions pertaining to intrinsic motivation in the Behavioral Regulation in Exercise Questionnaire-2. Additionally, participants were asked about their exercise behavior in the past 7 days and screened for cardio-metabolic risk factors. Higher ESES-scores were observed in those in the maintenance (n=17) versus those in the pre-action stage (n=17) of behavior change. Higher ESES-scores were also significantly associated with lower BSI-18 somatization and higher intrinsic motivation scores. Our data indicated that health care professionals should assist patients with psychosis in interpreting physiological states during exercise. Future research should explore whether bolstering such sources of information might directly or indirectly effect exercise self-efficacy.

AB - Despite the recognition of the importance of exercise self-efficacy in exercise adoption and maintenance, previous investigations on exercise self-efficacy in people with psychosis is scarce. The present study aimed to (1) explore if exercise self-efficacy differed between stages of behavior change in Ugandan outpatients with psychosis, and (2) assess sociodemographic, clinical and motivational correlates of exercise self-efficacy. In total, 48 patients (24 women) completed the Exercise Self-Efficacy Scale (ESES), the Patient-centered Assessment and Counseling for Exercise questionnaire, the Brief Symptoms Inventory-18 (BSI-18), and questions pertaining to intrinsic motivation in the Behavioral Regulation in Exercise Questionnaire-2. Additionally, participants were asked about their exercise behavior in the past 7 days and screened for cardio-metabolic risk factors. Higher ESES-scores were observed in those in the maintenance (n=17) versus those in the pre-action stage (n=17) of behavior change. Higher ESES-scores were also significantly associated with lower BSI-18 somatization and higher intrinsic motivation scores. Our data indicated that health care professionals should assist patients with psychosis in interpreting physiological states during exercise. Future research should explore whether bolstering such sources of information might directly or indirectly effect exercise self-efficacy.

KW - exercise

KW - physical activity

KW - psychosis

KW - self-efficacy

U2 - 10.1016/j.psychres.2017.08.095

DO - 10.1016/j.psychres.2017.08.095

M3 - Article

JO - Psychiatry Research

T2 - Psychiatry Research

JF - Psychiatry Research

SN - 0165-1781

ER -

ID: 7759010