Skip to content
Back to outputs

Facial expression in nonhuman animals

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Standard

Facial expression in nonhuman animals. / Waller, Bridget M.; Micheletta, Jerome.

In: Emotion Review, Vol. 5, No. 1, 01.2013, p. 54-59.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Harvard

Waller, BM & Micheletta, J 2013, 'Facial expression in nonhuman animals', Emotion Review, vol. 5, no. 1, pp. 54-59. https://doi.org/10.1177/1754073912451503

APA

Vancouver

Author

Waller, Bridget M. ; Micheletta, Jerome. / Facial expression in nonhuman animals. In: Emotion Review. 2013 ; Vol. 5, No. 1. pp. 54-59.

Bibtex

@article{3f78fafb26ff4ce1a9db292a6c23504f,
title = "Facial expression in nonhuman animals",
abstract = "Many nonhuman animals produce facial expressions which sometimes bear clear resemblance to the facial expressions seen in humans. An understanding of this evolutionary continuity between species, and how this relates to social and ecological variables, can help elucidate the meaning, function, and evolution of facial expression. This aim, however, requires researchers to overcome the theoretical and methodological differences in how human and nonhuman facial expressions are approached. Here, we review the literature relating to nonhuman facial expressions and suggest future directions that could facilitate a better understanding of facial expression within an evolutionary context.",
keywords = "animal signals, communication, evolution, facial displays, multimodality, primates",
author = "Waller, {Bridget M.} and Jerome Micheletta",
year = "2013",
month = jan,
doi = "10.1177/1754073912451503",
language = "English",
volume = "5",
pages = "54--59",
journal = "Emotion Review",
issn = "1754-0739",
publisher = "SAGE Publications Inc.",
number = "1",

}

RIS

TY - JOUR

T1 - Facial expression in nonhuman animals

AU - Waller, Bridget M.

AU - Micheletta, Jerome

PY - 2013/1

Y1 - 2013/1

N2 - Many nonhuman animals produce facial expressions which sometimes bear clear resemblance to the facial expressions seen in humans. An understanding of this evolutionary continuity between species, and how this relates to social and ecological variables, can help elucidate the meaning, function, and evolution of facial expression. This aim, however, requires researchers to overcome the theoretical and methodological differences in how human and nonhuman facial expressions are approached. Here, we review the literature relating to nonhuman facial expressions and suggest future directions that could facilitate a better understanding of facial expression within an evolutionary context.

AB - Many nonhuman animals produce facial expressions which sometimes bear clear resemblance to the facial expressions seen in humans. An understanding of this evolutionary continuity between species, and how this relates to social and ecological variables, can help elucidate the meaning, function, and evolution of facial expression. This aim, however, requires researchers to overcome the theoretical and methodological differences in how human and nonhuman facial expressions are approached. Here, we review the literature relating to nonhuman facial expressions and suggest future directions that could facilitate a better understanding of facial expression within an evolutionary context.

KW - animal signals

KW - communication

KW - evolution

KW - facial displays

KW - multimodality

KW - primates

U2 - 10.1177/1754073912451503

DO - 10.1177/1754073912451503

M3 - Article

VL - 5

SP - 54

EP - 59

JO - Emotion Review

JF - Emotion Review

SN - 1754-0739

IS - 1

ER -

ID: 1690931