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How many jobs does construction expenditure generate?

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Standard

How many jobs does construction expenditure generate? / Ball, Michael; Wood, Andrew.

In: Construction Management and Economics, Vol. 13, No. 4, 01.07.1995, p. 307-318.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Harvard

Ball, M & Wood, A 1995, 'How many jobs does construction expenditure generate?', Construction Management and Economics, vol. 13, no. 4, pp. 307-318. https://doi.org/10.1080/01446199500000036

APA

Ball, M., & Wood, A. (1995). How many jobs does construction expenditure generate? Construction Management and Economics, 13(4), 307-318. https://doi.org/10.1080/01446199500000036

Vancouver

Ball M, Wood A. How many jobs does construction expenditure generate? Construction Management and Economics. 1995 Jul 1;13(4):307-318. https://doi.org/10.1080/01446199500000036

Author

Ball, Michael ; Wood, Andrew. / How many jobs does construction expenditure generate?. In: Construction Management and Economics. 1995 ; Vol. 13, No. 4. pp. 307-318.

Bibtex

@article{516b14397c89468990ace8653b5ef64a,
title = "How many jobs does construction expenditure generate?",
abstract = "Extra public expenditure on construction is a frequently cited policy to alleviate demand deficient unemployment; yet the actual number of jobs created is uncertain. This paper surveys the job creation effect for the UK. It surveys previous estimates, then a construction employment model is estimated. The results do not conform to theoretical predictions, implying only a weak link between quarterly increases in total construction output and construction employment, and no significant relationship between housebuilding and employment. It is suggested that these results arise from poor quality data, especially the estimates of changes in the number of self-employed workers. As an alternative, construction industry rules-of-thumb are used to derive more plausible employment effects. Employment estimates are also provided for subsectors of the industry. To improve on these calculations we conclude that there is a need for either more accurate construction data or, failing that, periodic site-survey based estimates of construction production functions.",
keywords = "costs, Employment, public expenditure",
author = "Michael Ball and Andrew Wood",
year = "1995",
month = jul,
day = "1",
doi = "10.1080/01446199500000036",
language = "English",
volume = "13",
pages = "307--318",
journal = "Construction Management and Economics",
issn = "0144-6193",
publisher = "Routledge",
number = "4",

}

RIS

TY - JOUR

T1 - How many jobs does construction expenditure generate?

AU - Ball, Michael

AU - Wood, Andrew

PY - 1995/7/1

Y1 - 1995/7/1

N2 - Extra public expenditure on construction is a frequently cited policy to alleviate demand deficient unemployment; yet the actual number of jobs created is uncertain. This paper surveys the job creation effect for the UK. It surveys previous estimates, then a construction employment model is estimated. The results do not conform to theoretical predictions, implying only a weak link between quarterly increases in total construction output and construction employment, and no significant relationship between housebuilding and employment. It is suggested that these results arise from poor quality data, especially the estimates of changes in the number of self-employed workers. As an alternative, construction industry rules-of-thumb are used to derive more plausible employment effects. Employment estimates are also provided for subsectors of the industry. To improve on these calculations we conclude that there is a need for either more accurate construction data or, failing that, periodic site-survey based estimates of construction production functions.

AB - Extra public expenditure on construction is a frequently cited policy to alleviate demand deficient unemployment; yet the actual number of jobs created is uncertain. This paper surveys the job creation effect for the UK. It surveys previous estimates, then a construction employment model is estimated. The results do not conform to theoretical predictions, implying only a weak link between quarterly increases in total construction output and construction employment, and no significant relationship between housebuilding and employment. It is suggested that these results arise from poor quality data, especially the estimates of changes in the number of self-employed workers. As an alternative, construction industry rules-of-thumb are used to derive more plausible employment effects. Employment estimates are also provided for subsectors of the industry. To improve on these calculations we conclude that there is a need for either more accurate construction data or, failing that, periodic site-survey based estimates of construction production functions.

KW - costs

KW - Employment

KW - public expenditure

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=0029547338&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.1080/01446199500000036

DO - 10.1080/01446199500000036

M3 - Article

AN - SCOPUS:0029547338

VL - 13

SP - 307

EP - 318

JO - Construction Management and Economics

JF - Construction Management and Economics

SN - 0144-6193

IS - 4

ER -

ID: 8637111