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Mapping the complexities and highlighting the dangers: the global drive to end FGM in the UK and Sudan

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Mapping the complexities and highlighting the dangers : the global drive to end FGM in the UK and Sudan. / Bradley, Tamsin; Bedri, Nafisa.

In: Progress in Development Studies, Vol. 17, No. 1, 01.01.2017, p. 24-37.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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Bradley, Tamsin ; Bedri, Nafisa. / Mapping the complexities and highlighting the dangers : the global drive to end FGM in the UK and Sudan. In: Progress in Development Studies. 2017 ; Vol. 17, No. 1. pp. 24-37.

Bibtex

@article{05374332597741e4b1f5161c7c05e9d0,
title = "Mapping the complexities and highlighting the dangers: the global drive to end FGM in the UK and Sudan",
abstract = "This article maps out the UK Department for International Development{\textquoteright}s (DFID) global push to end the practice of Female Genital Mutilation/Cutting (FGM/C). In particular it looks at how the various components aim to link together filling evidence gaps and seeking to identify what works to finally end this brutal practice. Throughout the article we voice a caution that if the numerous programmes emerging are not shaped by grassroots experiences of FGM, and specifically by local change agents, there is real danger that this opportunity will fail. In highlighting this danger we present the viewpoint of community groups and local activists in the UK and also Sudan. We place these voices within the complex web of interventions that comprise the Free Sudan from FGM/C programme. If not sufficiently coordinated and responsive to communities it simply will not work. To emphasise this caution we draw on a variety of theories that help us understand how discourses around FGM have emerged and intertwine. We also draw on theory to highlight an over reliance on a constructed image of a suffering FGM victim which makes it difficult for local activists to be heard. ",
keywords = "female genital mutlilation, gender, human rights, Sudan, violence, culture, medicalisation",
author = "Tamsin Bradley and Nafisa Bedri",
year = "2017",
month = jan,
day = "1",
doi = "10.1177/1464993416674299",
language = "English",
volume = "17",
pages = "24--37",
journal = "Progress in Development Studies",
issn = "1464-9934",
publisher = "SAGE Publications Inc.",
number = "1",

}

RIS

TY - JOUR

T1 - Mapping the complexities and highlighting the dangers

T2 - the global drive to end FGM in the UK and Sudan

AU - Bradley, Tamsin

AU - Bedri, Nafisa

PY - 2017/1/1

Y1 - 2017/1/1

N2 - This article maps out the UK Department for International Development’s (DFID) global push to end the practice of Female Genital Mutilation/Cutting (FGM/C). In particular it looks at how the various components aim to link together filling evidence gaps and seeking to identify what works to finally end this brutal practice. Throughout the article we voice a caution that if the numerous programmes emerging are not shaped by grassroots experiences of FGM, and specifically by local change agents, there is real danger that this opportunity will fail. In highlighting this danger we present the viewpoint of community groups and local activists in the UK and also Sudan. We place these voices within the complex web of interventions that comprise the Free Sudan from FGM/C programme. If not sufficiently coordinated and responsive to communities it simply will not work. To emphasise this caution we draw on a variety of theories that help us understand how discourses around FGM have emerged and intertwine. We also draw on theory to highlight an over reliance on a constructed image of a suffering FGM victim which makes it difficult for local activists to be heard.

AB - This article maps out the UK Department for International Development’s (DFID) global push to end the practice of Female Genital Mutilation/Cutting (FGM/C). In particular it looks at how the various components aim to link together filling evidence gaps and seeking to identify what works to finally end this brutal practice. Throughout the article we voice a caution that if the numerous programmes emerging are not shaped by grassroots experiences of FGM, and specifically by local change agents, there is real danger that this opportunity will fail. In highlighting this danger we present the viewpoint of community groups and local activists in the UK and also Sudan. We place these voices within the complex web of interventions that comprise the Free Sudan from FGM/C programme. If not sufficiently coordinated and responsive to communities it simply will not work. To emphasise this caution we draw on a variety of theories that help us understand how discourses around FGM have emerged and intertwine. We also draw on theory to highlight an over reliance on a constructed image of a suffering FGM victim which makes it difficult for local activists to be heard.

KW - female genital mutlilation

KW - gender

KW - human rights

KW - Sudan

KW - violence

KW - culture

KW - medicalisation

U2 - 10.1177/1464993416674299

DO - 10.1177/1464993416674299

M3 - Article

VL - 17

SP - 24

EP - 37

JO - Progress in Development Studies

JF - Progress in Development Studies

SN - 1464-9934

IS - 1

ER -

ID: 5116551