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Maternal experiences of peanut avoidance during pregnancy/lactation: an in-depth qualitative study

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Maternal experiences of peanut avoidance during pregnancy/lactation: an in-depth qualitative study. / Turke, J.; Venter, Carina; Dean, Tara.

In: Pediatric Allergy and Immunology, Vol. 16, No. 6, 09.2005, p. 512-518.

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Turke, J. ; Venter, Carina ; Dean, Tara. / Maternal experiences of peanut avoidance during pregnancy/lactation: an in-depth qualitative study. In: Pediatric Allergy and Immunology. 2005 ; Vol. 16, No. 6. pp. 512-518.

Bibtex

@article{95f6e197e4d54af3adf3d6daa9f774d0,
title = "Maternal experiences of peanut avoidance during pregnancy/lactation: an in-depth qualitative study",
abstract = "In 1998 the Department of Health Committee on Toxicity of Chemicals in Food, Consumer Products and the Environment issued a report to British general practitioners, which advised that pregnant mothers with a family history of atopy may wish to avoid peanuts during pregnancy/lactation. To explore the lived-in experience of mothers who avoided/did not avoid peanuts during pregnancy/lactation in the light of the information issued. A qualitative approach, using unstructured in-depth interviews to explore what it was like for mothers to have a particular experience. A purposive sample frame was designed to ensure a maximum variation of participants. Forty-two interviews were conducted: 25 participants avoided peanuts; 15 with a family history of atopy and 10 with no such history. Seventeen participants did not avoid peanuts; 10 with a family history of atopy and seven with no such history. Emergent themes included: variations in information provision, a lack of clarity in relation to information and advice about peanut avoidance, the risks entailed and the introduction of peanuts to the developing child's diet; the importance of atopy in influencing participants’ decisions to avoid peanuts and the importance of individual's choice in the decision making process. There was a significant difference in family size with respect to avoidance behaviour with ‘avoider’ families being smaller (p = 0.007). Avoidance was more likely in single child families (71{\%} vs. 53{\%}) although this difference was not significant. Improvements to the experience of avoidance and/or non-avoidance were primarily focused around provision of information and advice. In particular, a need for clear, consistent factual information and advice about the real risks associated with peanut consumption during pregnancy/lactation, and to whom these risks apply.",
author = "J. Turke and Carina Venter and Tara Dean",
year = "2005",
month = "9",
doi = "10.1111/j.1399-3038.2005.00305.x",
language = "English",
volume = "16",
pages = "512--518",
journal = "Pediatric Allergy and Immunology",
issn = "0905-6157",
publisher = "Blackwell Munksgaard",
number = "6",

}

RIS

TY - JOUR

T1 - Maternal experiences of peanut avoidance during pregnancy/lactation: an in-depth qualitative study

AU - Turke, J.

AU - Venter, Carina

AU - Dean, Tara

PY - 2005/9

Y1 - 2005/9

N2 - In 1998 the Department of Health Committee on Toxicity of Chemicals in Food, Consumer Products and the Environment issued a report to British general practitioners, which advised that pregnant mothers with a family history of atopy may wish to avoid peanuts during pregnancy/lactation. To explore the lived-in experience of mothers who avoided/did not avoid peanuts during pregnancy/lactation in the light of the information issued. A qualitative approach, using unstructured in-depth interviews to explore what it was like for mothers to have a particular experience. A purposive sample frame was designed to ensure a maximum variation of participants. Forty-two interviews were conducted: 25 participants avoided peanuts; 15 with a family history of atopy and 10 with no such history. Seventeen participants did not avoid peanuts; 10 with a family history of atopy and seven with no such history. Emergent themes included: variations in information provision, a lack of clarity in relation to information and advice about peanut avoidance, the risks entailed and the introduction of peanuts to the developing child's diet; the importance of atopy in influencing participants’ decisions to avoid peanuts and the importance of individual's choice in the decision making process. There was a significant difference in family size with respect to avoidance behaviour with ‘avoider’ families being smaller (p = 0.007). Avoidance was more likely in single child families (71% vs. 53%) although this difference was not significant. Improvements to the experience of avoidance and/or non-avoidance were primarily focused around provision of information and advice. In particular, a need for clear, consistent factual information and advice about the real risks associated with peanut consumption during pregnancy/lactation, and to whom these risks apply.

AB - In 1998 the Department of Health Committee on Toxicity of Chemicals in Food, Consumer Products and the Environment issued a report to British general practitioners, which advised that pregnant mothers with a family history of atopy may wish to avoid peanuts during pregnancy/lactation. To explore the lived-in experience of mothers who avoided/did not avoid peanuts during pregnancy/lactation in the light of the information issued. A qualitative approach, using unstructured in-depth interviews to explore what it was like for mothers to have a particular experience. A purposive sample frame was designed to ensure a maximum variation of participants. Forty-two interviews were conducted: 25 participants avoided peanuts; 15 with a family history of atopy and 10 with no such history. Seventeen participants did not avoid peanuts; 10 with a family history of atopy and seven with no such history. Emergent themes included: variations in information provision, a lack of clarity in relation to information and advice about peanut avoidance, the risks entailed and the introduction of peanuts to the developing child's diet; the importance of atopy in influencing participants’ decisions to avoid peanuts and the importance of individual's choice in the decision making process. There was a significant difference in family size with respect to avoidance behaviour with ‘avoider’ families being smaller (p = 0.007). Avoidance was more likely in single child families (71% vs. 53%) although this difference was not significant. Improvements to the experience of avoidance and/or non-avoidance were primarily focused around provision of information and advice. In particular, a need for clear, consistent factual information and advice about the real risks associated with peanut consumption during pregnancy/lactation, and to whom these risks apply.

U2 - 10.1111/j.1399-3038.2005.00305.x

DO - 10.1111/j.1399-3038.2005.00305.x

M3 - Article

VL - 16

SP - 512

EP - 518

JO - Pediatric Allergy and Immunology

T2 - Pediatric Allergy and Immunology

JF - Pediatric Allergy and Immunology

SN - 0905-6157

IS - 6

ER -

ID: 209984