Skip to content
Back to outputs

Muslims, home education and risk in British society

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Standard

Muslims, home education and risk in British society. / Myers, Martin; Bhopal, Kalwant.

In: British Journal of Sociology of Education, Vol. 39, No. 2, 28.02.2018, p. 212-226.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Harvard

Myers, M & Bhopal, K 2018, 'Muslims, home education and risk in British society', British Journal of Sociology of Education, vol. 39, no. 2, pp. 212-226. https://doi.org/10.1080/01425692.2017.1406337

APA

Myers, M., & Bhopal, K. (2018). Muslims, home education and risk in British society. British Journal of Sociology of Education, 39(2), 212-226. https://doi.org/10.1080/01425692.2017.1406337

Vancouver

Myers M, Bhopal K. Muslims, home education and risk in British society. British Journal of Sociology of Education. 2018 Feb 28;39(2):212-226. https://doi.org/10.1080/01425692.2017.1406337

Author

Myers, Martin ; Bhopal, Kalwant. / Muslims, home education and risk in British society. In: British Journal of Sociology of Education. 2018 ; Vol. 39, No. 2. pp. 212-226.

Bibtex

@article{fefa0e358dd947f1a72d5f40ae4e8d89,
title = "Muslims, home education and risk in British society",
abstract = "The number of families who choose to home educate has significantly increased in the last decade (Winstanley, 2013). This article explores the experiences of British Muslims who home educate using data from a larger study exploring the views of a diverse range of families. Drawing on the work of Beck (1992) we discuss how {\textquoteleft}risk{\textquoteright} is understood in relation to Muslim home educators. For these families decisions to home educate were often made in response to identifying risks associated with their children attending school. At the same time OFSTED (2016) has identified {\textquoteleft}risks{\textquoteright} of radicalisation associated with the {\textquoteleft}Trojan Horse{\textquoteright} affair which they linked specifically to Muslim families{\textquoteright} who home educate. We argue that Muslim families are both marginalised by the perception of {\textquoteleft}risk{\textquoteright} associated with radicalisation and also by their consequent decisions to home educate.",
keywords = "Muslim, home education, homeschool, Ulrich Beck, risk , cosmopolitanism, neoliberalism, embargoover12",
author = "Martin Myers and Kalwant Bhopal",
year = "2018",
month = feb,
day = "28",
doi = "10.1080/01425692.2017.1406337",
language = "English",
volume = "39",
pages = "212--226",
journal = "British Journal of Sociology of Education",
issn = "0142-5692",
publisher = "Taylor and Francis Ltd.",
number = "2",

}

RIS

TY - JOUR

T1 - Muslims, home education and risk in British society

AU - Myers, Martin

AU - Bhopal, Kalwant

PY - 2018/2/28

Y1 - 2018/2/28

N2 - The number of families who choose to home educate has significantly increased in the last decade (Winstanley, 2013). This article explores the experiences of British Muslims who home educate using data from a larger study exploring the views of a diverse range of families. Drawing on the work of Beck (1992) we discuss how ‘risk’ is understood in relation to Muslim home educators. For these families decisions to home educate were often made in response to identifying risks associated with their children attending school. At the same time OFSTED (2016) has identified ‘risks’ of radicalisation associated with the ‘Trojan Horse’ affair which they linked specifically to Muslim families’ who home educate. We argue that Muslim families are both marginalised by the perception of ‘risk’ associated with radicalisation and also by their consequent decisions to home educate.

AB - The number of families who choose to home educate has significantly increased in the last decade (Winstanley, 2013). This article explores the experiences of British Muslims who home educate using data from a larger study exploring the views of a diverse range of families. Drawing on the work of Beck (1992) we discuss how ‘risk’ is understood in relation to Muslim home educators. For these families decisions to home educate were often made in response to identifying risks associated with their children attending school. At the same time OFSTED (2016) has identified ‘risks’ of radicalisation associated with the ‘Trojan Horse’ affair which they linked specifically to Muslim families’ who home educate. We argue that Muslim families are both marginalised by the perception of ‘risk’ associated with radicalisation and also by their consequent decisions to home educate.

KW - Muslim

KW - home education

KW - homeschool

KW - Ulrich Beck

KW - risk

KW - cosmopolitanism

KW - neoliberalism

KW - embargoover12

U2 - 10.1080/01425692.2017.1406337

DO - 10.1080/01425692.2017.1406337

M3 - Article

VL - 39

SP - 212

EP - 226

JO - British Journal of Sociology of Education

JF - British Journal of Sociology of Education

SN - 0142-5692

IS - 2

ER -

ID: 8102269