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Online frauds: learning from victims why they fall for these scams

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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Online frauds : learning from victims why they fall for these scams. / Button, Mark; McNaughton Nicholls, Carol; Kerr, Jane; Owen, Rachael.

In: The Australian and New Zealand Journal of Criminology, Vol. 47, No. 3, 12.2014, p. 391-408.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Harvard

Button, M, McNaughton Nicholls, C, Kerr, J & Owen, R 2014, 'Online frauds: learning from victims why they fall for these scams', The Australian and New Zealand Journal of Criminology, vol. 47, no. 3, pp. 391-408. https://doi.org/10.1177/0004865814521224

APA

Button, M., McNaughton Nicholls, C., Kerr, J., & Owen, R. (2014). Online frauds: learning from victims why they fall for these scams. The Australian and New Zealand Journal of Criminology, 47(3), 391-408. https://doi.org/10.1177/0004865814521224

Vancouver

Button M, McNaughton Nicholls C, Kerr J, Owen R. Online frauds: learning from victims why they fall for these scams. The Australian and New Zealand Journal of Criminology. 2014 Dec;47(3):391-408. https://doi.org/10.1177/0004865814521224

Author

Button, Mark ; McNaughton Nicholls, Carol ; Kerr, Jane ; Owen, Rachael. / Online frauds : learning from victims why they fall for these scams. In: The Australian and New Zealand Journal of Criminology. 2014 ; Vol. 47, No. 3. pp. 391-408.

Bibtex

@article{ad2a784ed2144cc8842ff64501ab3965,
title = "Online frauds: learning from victims why they fall for these scams",
abstract = "Online frauds have become a major problem in many countries with millions of victims from a wide diversity of scams committed in full or part online. This paper explores the extent and nature of this problem. Using data from depth interviews with 15 online fraud victims, 6 focus groups with a further 48 online fraud victims and interviews with 9 professional stakeholders involved in combating this problem. The paper explores why victims fall for online scams. It identifies a range of reasons including: the diversity of frauds, small amounts of money sought, authority and legitimacy displayed by scammers, visceral appeals, embarrassing frauds, pressure and coercion, grooming, fraud at a distance and multiple techniques. ",
author = "Mark Button and {McNaughton Nicholls}, Carol and Jane Kerr and Rachael Owen",
note = "This is the post-print version of an article originally published by SAGE in the Australian and New Zealand Journal of Criminology, originally published online on 28/03/2014.",
year = "2014",
month = dec,
doi = "10.1177/0004865814521224",
language = "English",
volume = "47",
pages = "391--408",
journal = "The Australian and New Zealand Journal of Criminology",
issn = "0004-8658",
publisher = "SAGE Publications Inc.",
number = "3",

}

RIS

TY - JOUR

T1 - Online frauds

T2 - learning from victims why they fall for these scams

AU - Button, Mark

AU - McNaughton Nicholls, Carol

AU - Kerr, Jane

AU - Owen, Rachael

N1 - This is the post-print version of an article originally published by SAGE in the Australian and New Zealand Journal of Criminology, originally published online on 28/03/2014.

PY - 2014/12

Y1 - 2014/12

N2 - Online frauds have become a major problem in many countries with millions of victims from a wide diversity of scams committed in full or part online. This paper explores the extent and nature of this problem. Using data from depth interviews with 15 online fraud victims, 6 focus groups with a further 48 online fraud victims and interviews with 9 professional stakeholders involved in combating this problem. The paper explores why victims fall for online scams. It identifies a range of reasons including: the diversity of frauds, small amounts of money sought, authority and legitimacy displayed by scammers, visceral appeals, embarrassing frauds, pressure and coercion, grooming, fraud at a distance and multiple techniques.

AB - Online frauds have become a major problem in many countries with millions of victims from a wide diversity of scams committed in full or part online. This paper explores the extent and nature of this problem. Using data from depth interviews with 15 online fraud victims, 6 focus groups with a further 48 online fraud victims and interviews with 9 professional stakeholders involved in combating this problem. The paper explores why victims fall for online scams. It identifies a range of reasons including: the diversity of frauds, small amounts of money sought, authority and legitimacy displayed by scammers, visceral appeals, embarrassing frauds, pressure and coercion, grooming, fraud at a distance and multiple techniques.

U2 - 10.1177/0004865814521224

DO - 10.1177/0004865814521224

M3 - Article

VL - 47

SP - 391

EP - 408

JO - The Australian and New Zealand Journal of Criminology

JF - The Australian and New Zealand Journal of Criminology

SN - 0004-8658

IS - 3

ER -

ID: 1834162