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Police use of nonverbal behavior as indicators of deception

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingChapter (peer-reviewed)

Standard

Police use of nonverbal behavior as indicators of deception. / Vrij, Aldert; Mann, Samantha.

Applications of nonverbal communication. ed. / R. Riggio; R. Feldman. Mahwah, New Jersey / London : Lawrence Erlbaum Associates, 2005. p. 63-94 (Claremont Symposium on Applied Social Psychology Series).

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingChapter (peer-reviewed)

Harvard

Vrij, A & Mann, S 2005, Police use of nonverbal behavior as indicators of deception. in R Riggio & R Feldman (eds), Applications of nonverbal communication. Claremont Symposium on Applied Social Psychology Series, Lawrence Erlbaum Associates, Mahwah, New Jersey / London, pp. 63-94.

APA

Vrij, A., & Mann, S. (2005). Police use of nonverbal behavior as indicators of deception. In R. Riggio, & R. Feldman (Eds.), Applications of nonverbal communication (pp. 63-94). (Claremont Symposium on Applied Social Psychology Series). Mahwah, New Jersey / London: Lawrence Erlbaum Associates.

Vancouver

Vrij A, Mann S. Police use of nonverbal behavior as indicators of deception. In Riggio R, Feldman R, editors, Applications of nonverbal communication. Mahwah, New Jersey / London: Lawrence Erlbaum Associates. 2005. p. 63-94. (Claremont Symposium on Applied Social Psychology Series).

Author

Vrij, Aldert ; Mann, Samantha. / Police use of nonverbal behavior as indicators of deception. Applications of nonverbal communication. editor / R. Riggio ; R. Feldman. Mahwah, New Jersey / London : Lawrence Erlbaum Associates, 2005. pp. 63-94 (Claremont Symposium on Applied Social Psychology Series).

Bibtex

@inbook{f28f092864f04e1bb082040f6ef91363,
title = "Police use of nonverbal behavior as indicators of deception",
abstract = "People rely on various sources of information when they form impressions about others. They could pay attention to various characteristics of the target person, such as gender (Hall & Carter, 1999; Stangor, Lynch, Changming, & Glass, 1992), age (Hargie & Tourish, 1999; Hummert, 1999), race (Brown, 1995; Ruby & Brigham, 1996), dialect (Giles & Johnson, 1986; Giles & Powesland, 1975; Street & Hopper, 1982), dress (Vrij, 1993), clothing (Frank & Gilovich, 1988; Vrij, 1997), and facial appearance (Bull & Rumsey, 1988). They also could examine what people actually say (speech content, Krauss & Chiu, 1998; Steller & Kohnken, 1989) or observe their behavior (DePaulo & Friedman, 1998). In this article we primarily focus on the impact of nonverbal communication on impression formation. Nonverbal behavior does not only include body language, such as movements people make, smiling, gaze behavior, etc., but also vocal characteristics, such as speech rate, speech pauses, uhms and ers, pitch of voice, etc. In addition, we primarily focus on a specific area within impression formation, which is the judgment about whether or not someone is lying (we will use the words deception and lying interchangeably). As Horvath, Jayne and Buckley (1994) pointed out, making judgements about the veracity of statements is an important aspect of police work.",
author = "Aldert Vrij and Samantha Mann",
year = "2005",
language = "English",
isbn = "9780805843347",
series = "Claremont Symposium on Applied Social Psychology Series",
publisher = "Lawrence Erlbaum Associates",
pages = "63--94",
editor = "R. Riggio and R. Feldman",
booktitle = "Applications of nonverbal communication",

}

RIS

TY - CHAP

T1 - Police use of nonverbal behavior as indicators of deception

AU - Vrij, Aldert

AU - Mann, Samantha

PY - 2005

Y1 - 2005

N2 - People rely on various sources of information when they form impressions about others. They could pay attention to various characteristics of the target person, such as gender (Hall & Carter, 1999; Stangor, Lynch, Changming, & Glass, 1992), age (Hargie & Tourish, 1999; Hummert, 1999), race (Brown, 1995; Ruby & Brigham, 1996), dialect (Giles & Johnson, 1986; Giles & Powesland, 1975; Street & Hopper, 1982), dress (Vrij, 1993), clothing (Frank & Gilovich, 1988; Vrij, 1997), and facial appearance (Bull & Rumsey, 1988). They also could examine what people actually say (speech content, Krauss & Chiu, 1998; Steller & Kohnken, 1989) or observe their behavior (DePaulo & Friedman, 1998). In this article we primarily focus on the impact of nonverbal communication on impression formation. Nonverbal behavior does not only include body language, such as movements people make, smiling, gaze behavior, etc., but also vocal characteristics, such as speech rate, speech pauses, uhms and ers, pitch of voice, etc. In addition, we primarily focus on a specific area within impression formation, which is the judgment about whether or not someone is lying (we will use the words deception and lying interchangeably). As Horvath, Jayne and Buckley (1994) pointed out, making judgements about the veracity of statements is an important aspect of police work.

AB - People rely on various sources of information when they form impressions about others. They could pay attention to various characteristics of the target person, such as gender (Hall & Carter, 1999; Stangor, Lynch, Changming, & Glass, 1992), age (Hargie & Tourish, 1999; Hummert, 1999), race (Brown, 1995; Ruby & Brigham, 1996), dialect (Giles & Johnson, 1986; Giles & Powesland, 1975; Street & Hopper, 1982), dress (Vrij, 1993), clothing (Frank & Gilovich, 1988; Vrij, 1997), and facial appearance (Bull & Rumsey, 1988). They also could examine what people actually say (speech content, Krauss & Chiu, 1998; Steller & Kohnken, 1989) or observe their behavior (DePaulo & Friedman, 1998). In this article we primarily focus on the impact of nonverbal communication on impression formation. Nonverbal behavior does not only include body language, such as movements people make, smiling, gaze behavior, etc., but also vocal characteristics, such as speech rate, speech pauses, uhms and ers, pitch of voice, etc. In addition, we primarily focus on a specific area within impression formation, which is the judgment about whether or not someone is lying (we will use the words deception and lying interchangeably). As Horvath, Jayne and Buckley (1994) pointed out, making judgements about the veracity of statements is an important aspect of police work.

M3 - Chapter (peer-reviewed)

SN - 9780805843347

T3 - Claremont Symposium on Applied Social Psychology Series

SP - 63

EP - 94

BT - Applications of nonverbal communication

A2 - Riggio, R.

A2 - Feldman, R.

PB - Lawrence Erlbaum Associates

CY - Mahwah, New Jersey / London

ER -

ID: 204732