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Port towns and diplomacy: Japanese naval visits to Britain and Australia in the early twentieth century

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The Anglo-Japanese Alliance of 1905 was a watershed moment for the presence of the Royal Navy in the Pacific. Although it allowed the Royal Navy to concentrate its fleets in European waters, this strategy caused resentment due to the underlying fear of the ‘Yellow Peril’, especially in the British dominions of Australia and New Zealand. The Anglo-Japanese Alliance presented some challenges to the received Edwardian racial hierarchy and the idea of British military supremacy. This article demonstrates how the ‘port town’ not only became a place of mediation where high-level international diplomacy mingled with the face-to-face experience of an alliance ‘in practice’, but also a space through which issues such as Otherness and imperial security were contested and explored.
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)45-60
JournalInternational Journal of Maritime History
Volume32
Issue number1
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 1 Feb 2020

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  • Port Towns and Diplomacy

    Rights statement: Melanie Bassett, 'Port towns and diplomacy: Japanese naval visits to Britain and Australia in the early twentieth century'. International Journal of Maritime History, 32(1), pp. 45-60. Copyright © 2020 (The Author). DOI: 10.1177/0843871420903160.

    Accepted author manuscript (Post-print), 321 KB, PDF document

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