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Predicting consumers’ cheating behavior. The role of mental representation of goods and psychological ownership

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This study examines the likelihood of cheating when consumers are offered with the option of using postponed payment plans after purchasing hedonic goods. It addresses how the nature of the good combined with payment timing affects its perceived psychological ownership, which in turn influences consumers’ cheating behavior. Three experimental studies indicate that when consumers mentally represent a hedonic (vs. utilitarian) good, they are more likely to cheat. This effect is greater with a postponed payment than with an immediate one. Findings also show that perceived psychological ownership is lower for hedonic goods and this explains different levels of cheating behavior. The paper offers managerial guidance on how to increase perceived psychological ownership for hedonic goods, with the goal of reducing cheating behavior.
Original languageEnglish
JournalPsychology and Marketing
Early online date22 Aug 2019
DOIs
Publication statusEarly online - 22 Aug 2019

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  • Predicting consumers’ cheating behavior

    Rights statement: This is the peer reviewed version of the following article: Viglia, G, Tassiello, V, Gordon‐Wilson, S, Grazzini, L. Predicting consumers’ cheating behavior. The role of mental representation of goods and psychological ownership. Psychology and Marketing, 2019, which has been published in final form at https://doi.org/10.1002/mar.21254. This article may be used for non-commercial purposes in accordance with Wiley Terms and Conditions for Use of Self-Archived Versions.

    Accepted author manuscript (Post-print), 451 KB, PDF document

    Due to publisher’s copyright restrictions, this document is not freely available to download from this website until: 22/08/21

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