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Refurbishing old buildings reduces emissions – but outdated tax rates make it expensive

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Refurbishing old buildings reduces emissions – but outdated tax rates make it expensive. / Menteth, Walter.

In: The Conversation, 25.10.2019, p. 1.

Research output: Contribution to specialist publicationArticle

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title = "Refurbishing old buildings reduces emissions – but outdated tax rates make it expensive",
abstract = "The construction of new buildings in the UK emits 48 megatonnes of carbon dioxide (CO₂) each year – that’s equal to the net emissions of the entire country of Scotland. The materials, transportation and construction processes for new buildings are all carbon intensive. Existing buildings already embody significant CO₂ emissions, which makes it all the more important to upgrade and refurbish – rather than demolish and rebuild – wherever possible. But as it stands, the UK’s tax system actually puts a significant financial penalty on refurbishment, while incentivising new construction – but there's a very easy fix to reverse this.",
keywords = "procurement, taxation, tax, VAT, construction, architecture, refurbishment, circular economy",
author = "Walter Menteth",
year = "2019",
month = "10",
day = "25",
language = "English",
pages = "1",
journal = "The Conversation",
publisher = "The Conversation",

}

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AU - Menteth, Walter

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N2 - The construction of new buildings in the UK emits 48 megatonnes of carbon dioxide (CO₂) each year – that’s equal to the net emissions of the entire country of Scotland. The materials, transportation and construction processes for new buildings are all carbon intensive. Existing buildings already embody significant CO₂ emissions, which makes it all the more important to upgrade and refurbish – rather than demolish and rebuild – wherever possible. But as it stands, the UK’s tax system actually puts a significant financial penalty on refurbishment, while incentivising new construction – but there's a very easy fix to reverse this.

AB - The construction of new buildings in the UK emits 48 megatonnes of carbon dioxide (CO₂) each year – that’s equal to the net emissions of the entire country of Scotland. The materials, transportation and construction processes for new buildings are all carbon intensive. Existing buildings already embody significant CO₂ emissions, which makes it all the more important to upgrade and refurbish – rather than demolish and rebuild – wherever possible. But as it stands, the UK’s tax system actually puts a significant financial penalty on refurbishment, while incentivising new construction – but there's a very easy fix to reverse this.

KW - procurement

KW - taxation

KW - tax

KW - VAT

KW - construction

KW - architecture

KW - refurbishment

KW - circular economy

M3 - Article

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JO - The Conversation

JF - The Conversation

PB - The Conversation

ER -

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