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Rethinking deindustrialisation and male career crisis

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Rethinking deindustrialisation and male career crisis. / Ackers, George.

In: British Journal of Guidance & Counselling, Vol. 42, No. 5, 2014, p. 500-510.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Harvard

Ackers, G 2014, 'Rethinking deindustrialisation and male career crisis', British Journal of Guidance & Counselling, vol. 42, no. 5, pp. 500-510. https://doi.org/10.1080/03069885.2014.920077

APA

Vancouver

Author

Ackers, George. / Rethinking deindustrialisation and male career crisis. In: British Journal of Guidance & Counselling. 2014 ; Vol. 42, No. 5. pp. 500-510.

Bibtex

@article{78272e5edce1476daf5aa92f6a980d06,
title = "Rethinking deindustrialisation and male career crisis",
abstract = "The decline in manufacturing and growth of service based jobs has prompted many social theorists to argue that the ability of working class men to construct meaningful and rewarding careers is becoming ever more limited. Despite using the universal label ‘working class’ the experience of skilled working class men has been largely ignored. This article explores 26 work history interviews collected from 14 former Royal Dockyard tradesmen in South East England and 12 of these men’s sons and grandsons. Findings from this research challenges the idea that most men were/and are passive victims of industrial change. By contrast, the majority of men in this study managed to carefully adapt to and navigate the transition from industrial to post-industrial work whilst still retaining a ‘linear life narrative’ (Sennett, 1998) to give meaning to their evolving careers and lives.",
keywords = "Deindustrialisation, male identity, 'crisis' of masculinity, career transition",
author = "George Ackers",
note = "{"}This is an Accepted Manuscript of an article published by Taylor & Francis in 'British journal of guidance & counselling' on 2014, available online: http://wwww.tandfonline.com/10.1080/03069885.2014.920077.{"}",
year = "2014",
doi = "10.1080/03069885.2014.920077",
language = "English",
volume = "42",
pages = "500--510",
journal = "British Journal of Guidance & Counselling",
issn = "0306-9885",
publisher = "Routledge",
number = "5",

}

RIS

TY - JOUR

T1 - Rethinking deindustrialisation and male career crisis

AU - Ackers, George

N1 - "This is an Accepted Manuscript of an article published by Taylor & Francis in 'British journal of guidance & counselling' on 2014, available online: http://wwww.tandfonline.com/10.1080/03069885.2014.920077."

PY - 2014

Y1 - 2014

N2 - The decline in manufacturing and growth of service based jobs has prompted many social theorists to argue that the ability of working class men to construct meaningful and rewarding careers is becoming ever more limited. Despite using the universal label ‘working class’ the experience of skilled working class men has been largely ignored. This article explores 26 work history interviews collected from 14 former Royal Dockyard tradesmen in South East England and 12 of these men’s sons and grandsons. Findings from this research challenges the idea that most men were/and are passive victims of industrial change. By contrast, the majority of men in this study managed to carefully adapt to and navigate the transition from industrial to post-industrial work whilst still retaining a ‘linear life narrative’ (Sennett, 1998) to give meaning to their evolving careers and lives.

AB - The decline in manufacturing and growth of service based jobs has prompted many social theorists to argue that the ability of working class men to construct meaningful and rewarding careers is becoming ever more limited. Despite using the universal label ‘working class’ the experience of skilled working class men has been largely ignored. This article explores 26 work history interviews collected from 14 former Royal Dockyard tradesmen in South East England and 12 of these men’s sons and grandsons. Findings from this research challenges the idea that most men were/and are passive victims of industrial change. By contrast, the majority of men in this study managed to carefully adapt to and navigate the transition from industrial to post-industrial work whilst still retaining a ‘linear life narrative’ (Sennett, 1998) to give meaning to their evolving careers and lives.

KW - Deindustrialisation

KW - male identity

KW - 'crisis' of masculinity

KW - career transition

U2 - 10.1080/03069885.2014.920077

DO - 10.1080/03069885.2014.920077

M3 - Article

VL - 42

SP - 500

EP - 510

JO - British Journal of Guidance & Counselling

JF - British Journal of Guidance & Counselling

SN - 0306-9885

IS - 5

ER -

ID: 1878683