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Sober rebels or good consumer-citizens? Anti-consumption and the ‘enterprising self’ in early sobriety

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Sober rebels or good consumer-citizens? Anti-consumption and the ‘enterprising self’ in early sobriety. / Nicholls, Emily.

In: Sociology, 18.11.2020.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

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@article{6e3b223454e64fecb81fe7a18f80c15a,
title = "Sober rebels or good consumer-citizens? Anti-consumption and the {\textquoteleft}enterprising self{\textquoteright} in early sobriety",
abstract = "Former drinkers in the UK are required to negotiate sobriety in a society that positions consumption (of alcohol but also more widely) as an important part of identity formation. A refusal to consume risks positioning the self outside of the established neoliberal order, particularly as traditional models of sobriety and {\textquoteleft}recovery{\textquoteright} position the non-drinker as diseased or flawed. As drinking rates decline across Western contexts and new movements celebrating sobriety as a positive {\textquoteleft}lifestyle choice{\textquoteright} proliferate, this paper will highlight ways in which sober women rework elements of traditional recovery models in order to construct an {\textquoteleft}enterprising self{\textquoteright} who remains a good consumer-citizen despite – or indeed because of – their refusal to drink. In doing so, this paper enhances our understandings of the ways in which neoliberal notions of a successful, enterprising self can be incorporated into (re)constructions of the self and identity by {\textquoteleft}anti-consumers{\textquoteright} more widely. ",
author = "Emily Nicholls",
year = "2020",
month = nov,
day = "18",
language = "English",
journal = "Sociology",
issn = "0038-0385",
publisher = "SAGE Publications Inc.",

}

RIS

TY - JOUR

T1 - Sober rebels or good consumer-citizens? Anti-consumption and the ‘enterprising self’ in early sobriety

AU - Nicholls, Emily

PY - 2020/11/18

Y1 - 2020/11/18

N2 - Former drinkers in the UK are required to negotiate sobriety in a society that positions consumption (of alcohol but also more widely) as an important part of identity formation. A refusal to consume risks positioning the self outside of the established neoliberal order, particularly as traditional models of sobriety and ‘recovery’ position the non-drinker as diseased or flawed. As drinking rates decline across Western contexts and new movements celebrating sobriety as a positive ‘lifestyle choice’ proliferate, this paper will highlight ways in which sober women rework elements of traditional recovery models in order to construct an ‘enterprising self’ who remains a good consumer-citizen despite – or indeed because of – their refusal to drink. In doing so, this paper enhances our understandings of the ways in which neoliberal notions of a successful, enterprising self can be incorporated into (re)constructions of the self and identity by ‘anti-consumers’ more widely.

AB - Former drinkers in the UK are required to negotiate sobriety in a society that positions consumption (of alcohol but also more widely) as an important part of identity formation. A refusal to consume risks positioning the self outside of the established neoliberal order, particularly as traditional models of sobriety and ‘recovery’ position the non-drinker as diseased or flawed. As drinking rates decline across Western contexts and new movements celebrating sobriety as a positive ‘lifestyle choice’ proliferate, this paper will highlight ways in which sober women rework elements of traditional recovery models in order to construct an ‘enterprising self’ who remains a good consumer-citizen despite – or indeed because of – their refusal to drink. In doing so, this paper enhances our understandings of the ways in which neoliberal notions of a successful, enterprising self can be incorporated into (re)constructions of the self and identity by ‘anti-consumers’ more widely.

M3 - Article

JO - Sociology

JF - Sociology

SN - 0038-0385

ER -

ID: 23507050