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'Someone to talk to' and 'pain control': What people expect from a specialist palliative care team

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'Someone to talk to' and 'pain control' : What people expect from a specialist palliative care team. / Jarrett, N.; Payne, S.; Turner, P.; Hillier, R.

In: Palliative Medicine, Vol. 13, No. 2, 21.04.1999, p. 139-144.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

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Jarrett, N. ; Payne, S. ; Turner, P. ; Hillier, R. / 'Someone to talk to' and 'pain control' : What people expect from a specialist palliative care team. In: Palliative Medicine. 1999 ; Vol. 13, No. 2. pp. 139-144.

Bibtex

@article{28a6c64894634707a0dd9359772322c3,
title = "'Someone to talk to' and 'pain control': What people expect from a specialist palliative care team",
abstract = "This paper presents a qualitative analysis of a subsample of data from a larger investigation into general practitioner referrals to specialist palliative care services (SPCS). The aim was to identify the expectations and perceptions of patients with advanced cancer and their relatives. Twenty-nine individuals were interviewed (18 patients, 11 relatives). Qualitative analysis of the interview transcripts was undertaken using an approach based on interpretative phenomenological analysis. The results indicated that SPCS were perceived as providing psychosocial services, characterized as 'support' and 'someone to talk to'. SPCS were expected to have 'expertise in symptom control', particularly in relation to pain management. The study demonstrated that patients' and relatives' expectations of a referral to SPCS were of psychosocial support and symptom control. It is argued that the implications of this restricted view of SPCS may mean that other salient concerns are not raised by patients and relatives.",
keywords = "Caregivers, Palliative care, Patient care, Terminal care",
author = "N. Jarrett and S. Payne and P. Turner and R. Hillier",
year = "1999",
month = apr,
day = "21",
doi = "10.1191/026921699669165706",
language = "English",
volume = "13",
pages = "139--144",
journal = "BAOJ Palliative medicine",
issn = "0269-2163",
publisher = "SAGE Publications Ltd",
number = "2",

}

RIS

TY - JOUR

T1 - 'Someone to talk to' and 'pain control'

T2 - What people expect from a specialist palliative care team

AU - Jarrett, N.

AU - Payne, S.

AU - Turner, P.

AU - Hillier, R.

PY - 1999/4/21

Y1 - 1999/4/21

N2 - This paper presents a qualitative analysis of a subsample of data from a larger investigation into general practitioner referrals to specialist palliative care services (SPCS). The aim was to identify the expectations and perceptions of patients with advanced cancer and their relatives. Twenty-nine individuals were interviewed (18 patients, 11 relatives). Qualitative analysis of the interview transcripts was undertaken using an approach based on interpretative phenomenological analysis. The results indicated that SPCS were perceived as providing psychosocial services, characterized as 'support' and 'someone to talk to'. SPCS were expected to have 'expertise in symptom control', particularly in relation to pain management. The study demonstrated that patients' and relatives' expectations of a referral to SPCS were of psychosocial support and symptom control. It is argued that the implications of this restricted view of SPCS may mean that other salient concerns are not raised by patients and relatives.

AB - This paper presents a qualitative analysis of a subsample of data from a larger investigation into general practitioner referrals to specialist palliative care services (SPCS). The aim was to identify the expectations and perceptions of patients with advanced cancer and their relatives. Twenty-nine individuals were interviewed (18 patients, 11 relatives). Qualitative analysis of the interview transcripts was undertaken using an approach based on interpretative phenomenological analysis. The results indicated that SPCS were perceived as providing psychosocial services, characterized as 'support' and 'someone to talk to'. SPCS were expected to have 'expertise in symptom control', particularly in relation to pain management. The study demonstrated that patients' and relatives' expectations of a referral to SPCS were of psychosocial support and symptom control. It is argued that the implications of this restricted view of SPCS may mean that other salient concerns are not raised by patients and relatives.

KW - Caregivers

KW - Palliative care

KW - Patient care

KW - Terminal care

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=0032906524&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.1191/026921699669165706

DO - 10.1191/026921699669165706

M3 - Article

C2 - 10474696

AN - SCOPUS:0032906524

VL - 13

SP - 139

EP - 144

JO - BAOJ Palliative medicine

JF - BAOJ Palliative medicine

SN - 0269-2163

IS - 2

ER -

ID: 11526387