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Story and recall in first person shooters

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

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Story and recall in first person shooters. / Pinchbeck, Dan.

In: International Journal of Computer Games Technology, 2008, p. 1-7.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Harvard

Pinchbeck, D 2008, 'Story and recall in first person shooters', International Journal of Computer Games Technology, pp. 1-7. https://doi.org/10.1155/2008/783231

APA

Pinchbeck, D. (2008). Story and recall in first person shooters. International Journal of Computer Games Technology, 1-7. https://doi.org/10.1155/2008/783231

Vancouver

Pinchbeck D. Story and recall in first person shooters. International Journal of Computer Games Technology. 2008;1-7. https://doi.org/10.1155/2008/783231

Author

Pinchbeck, Dan. / Story and recall in first person shooters. In: International Journal of Computer Games Technology. 2008 ; pp. 1-7.

Bibtex

@article{1c7df1402805468095c0e92432bfb6d9,
title = "Story and recall in first person shooters",
abstract = "Story has traditionally been seen as something separate to gameplay—frequently relegated to an afterthought or epiphenomenon. Nevertheless, in the FPS genre there has been something of a renaissance in the notion of the story-driven title. Partially, this is due to advances in technology enabling a greater capacity for distributed storytelling and a better integration of story and gameplay. However, what has been underrecognised is the dynamic, epistemological, and psychological impact of story and story elements upon player behaviour. It is argued here that there is evidence that story may have a direct influence upon cognitive operations. Specifically, evidence is presented that it appears to demonstrate that games with highly visible, detailed stories may assist players in recalling and ordering their experiences. If story does, indeed, have a more direct influence, then it is clearly a more powerful and immediate tool in game design than either simply reward system or golden thread.",
author = "Dan Pinchbeck",
year = "2008",
doi = "10.1155/2008/783231",
language = "English",
pages = "1--7",
journal = "International Journal of Computer Games Technology",
issn = "1687-7047",
publisher = "Hindawi Publishing Corporation",

}

RIS

TY - JOUR

T1 - Story and recall in first person shooters

AU - Pinchbeck, Dan

PY - 2008

Y1 - 2008

N2 - Story has traditionally been seen as something separate to gameplay—frequently relegated to an afterthought or epiphenomenon. Nevertheless, in the FPS genre there has been something of a renaissance in the notion of the story-driven title. Partially, this is due to advances in technology enabling a greater capacity for distributed storytelling and a better integration of story and gameplay. However, what has been underrecognised is the dynamic, epistemological, and psychological impact of story and story elements upon player behaviour. It is argued here that there is evidence that story may have a direct influence upon cognitive operations. Specifically, evidence is presented that it appears to demonstrate that games with highly visible, detailed stories may assist players in recalling and ordering their experiences. If story does, indeed, have a more direct influence, then it is clearly a more powerful and immediate tool in game design than either simply reward system or golden thread.

AB - Story has traditionally been seen as something separate to gameplay—frequently relegated to an afterthought or epiphenomenon. Nevertheless, in the FPS genre there has been something of a renaissance in the notion of the story-driven title. Partially, this is due to advances in technology enabling a greater capacity for distributed storytelling and a better integration of story and gameplay. However, what has been underrecognised is the dynamic, epistemological, and psychological impact of story and story elements upon player behaviour. It is argued here that there is evidence that story may have a direct influence upon cognitive operations. Specifically, evidence is presented that it appears to demonstrate that games with highly visible, detailed stories may assist players in recalling and ordering their experiences. If story does, indeed, have a more direct influence, then it is clearly a more powerful and immediate tool in game design than either simply reward system or golden thread.

U2 - 10.1155/2008/783231

DO - 10.1155/2008/783231

M3 - Article

SP - 1

EP - 7

JO - International Journal of Computer Games Technology

JF - International Journal of Computer Games Technology

SN - 1687-7047

ER -

ID: 74436