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Structured word-lists as a model of basic schemata: deviations from content and order in a repeated event paradigm

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Structured word-lists as a model of basic schemata: deviations from content and order in a repeated event paradigm. / Rubinova, Eva; Blank, Hartmut; Ost, James; Fitzgerald, Ryan.

In: Memory, 09.01.2020.

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@article{1bffe1a174f54309ae418bcc105d9a82,
title = "Structured word-lists as a model of basic schemata: deviations from content and order in a repeated event paradigm",
abstract = "Repeated events are common in everyday life, but relatively neglected as a topic within memory psychology. In two samples of adults, we investigated memory for repeated, schema-establishing simple events (operationalised as structured word-lists), and the effects of deviations within those events. We focused on the effects of deviations from two core dimensions of schema: content and order. Across three successive word-list events, we established and reinforced a basic list schema by always presenting three content categories in the same order. These expectations were violated in a fourth and final word-list. We measured the effects on memory of both the violating and the schema-establishing lists inmultiple recall attempts over a period of one month. We measured correct recall,misattribution errors, metacognitive awareness of list-organisation and deviations, and recall organisation. Across all delays and across all word-lists (not only the final one), content changes increased recall, whereas order changes decreased recall. Participants were also more aware of content changes than order changes. These disparate effects suggest that the two types of schema-deviations may have qualitatively different effects on memory for specific instances of a repeated generic event. Cognitive processes underlying memory for typical and exceptional instances of repeated events are discussed.",
keywords = "Schema, source memory, metacognition, recall organisation, repeated events, schema-deviation",
author = "Eva Rubinova and Hartmut Blank and James Ost and Ryan Fitzgerald",
year = "2020",
month = "1",
day = "9",
doi = "10.1080/09658211.2020.1712421",
language = "English",
journal = "Memory",
issn = "0965-8211",
publisher = "Psychology Press Ltd",

}

RIS

TY - JOUR

T1 - Structured word-lists as a model of basic schemata: deviations from content and order in a repeated event paradigm

AU - Rubinova, Eva

AU - Blank, Hartmut

AU - Ost, James

AU - Fitzgerald, Ryan

PY - 2020/1/9

Y1 - 2020/1/9

N2 - Repeated events are common in everyday life, but relatively neglected as a topic within memory psychology. In two samples of adults, we investigated memory for repeated, schema-establishing simple events (operationalised as structured word-lists), and the effects of deviations within those events. We focused on the effects of deviations from two core dimensions of schema: content and order. Across three successive word-list events, we established and reinforced a basic list schema by always presenting three content categories in the same order. These expectations were violated in a fourth and final word-list. We measured the effects on memory of both the violating and the schema-establishing lists inmultiple recall attempts over a period of one month. We measured correct recall,misattribution errors, metacognitive awareness of list-organisation and deviations, and recall organisation. Across all delays and across all word-lists (not only the final one), content changes increased recall, whereas order changes decreased recall. Participants were also more aware of content changes than order changes. These disparate effects suggest that the two types of schema-deviations may have qualitatively different effects on memory for specific instances of a repeated generic event. Cognitive processes underlying memory for typical and exceptional instances of repeated events are discussed.

AB - Repeated events are common in everyday life, but relatively neglected as a topic within memory psychology. In two samples of adults, we investigated memory for repeated, schema-establishing simple events (operationalised as structured word-lists), and the effects of deviations within those events. We focused on the effects of deviations from two core dimensions of schema: content and order. Across three successive word-list events, we established and reinforced a basic list schema by always presenting three content categories in the same order. These expectations were violated in a fourth and final word-list. We measured the effects on memory of both the violating and the schema-establishing lists inmultiple recall attempts over a period of one month. We measured correct recall,misattribution errors, metacognitive awareness of list-organisation and deviations, and recall organisation. Across all delays and across all word-lists (not only the final one), content changes increased recall, whereas order changes decreased recall. Participants were also more aware of content changes than order changes. These disparate effects suggest that the two types of schema-deviations may have qualitatively different effects on memory for specific instances of a repeated generic event. Cognitive processes underlying memory for typical and exceptional instances of repeated events are discussed.

KW - Schema

KW - source memory

KW - metacognition

KW - recall organisation

KW - repeated events

KW - schema-deviation

UR - https://osf.io/bzvfw/

U2 - 10.1080/09658211.2020.1712421

DO - 10.1080/09658211.2020.1712421

M3 - Article

JO - Memory

JF - Memory

SN - 0965-8211

ER -

ID: 17874504