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The correlation between halo mass and stellar mass for the most massive galaxies in the universe

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The correlation between halo mass and stellar mass for the most massive galaxies in the universe. / Tinker, Jeremy L.; Brownstein, Joel R.; Guo, Hong; Leauthaud, Alexie; Maraston, Claudia; Masters, Karen; Montero-Dorta, Antonio D.; Thomas, Daniel; Tojeiro, Rita; Weiner, Benjamin; Zehavi, Idit; Olmstead, Matthew D.

In: The Astrophysical Journal, Vol. 839, No. 2, 121, 24.04.2017.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Harvard

Tinker, JL, Brownstein, JR, Guo, H, Leauthaud, A, Maraston, C, Masters, K, Montero-Dorta, AD, Thomas, D, Tojeiro, R, Weiner, B, Zehavi, I & Olmstead, MD 2017, 'The correlation between halo mass and stellar mass for the most massive galaxies in the universe', The Astrophysical Journal, vol. 839, no. 2, 121. https://doi.org/10.3847/1538-4357/aa6845

APA

Tinker, J. L., Brownstein, J. R., Guo, H., Leauthaud, A., Maraston, C., Masters, K., ... Olmstead, M. D. (2017). The correlation between halo mass and stellar mass for the most massive galaxies in the universe. The Astrophysical Journal, 839(2), [121]. https://doi.org/10.3847/1538-4357/aa6845

Vancouver

Tinker JL, Brownstein JR, Guo H, Leauthaud A, Maraston C, Masters K et al. The correlation between halo mass and stellar mass for the most massive galaxies in the universe. The Astrophysical Journal. 2017 Apr 24;839(2). 121. https://doi.org/10.3847/1538-4357/aa6845

Author

Tinker, Jeremy L. ; Brownstein, Joel R. ; Guo, Hong ; Leauthaud, Alexie ; Maraston, Claudia ; Masters, Karen ; Montero-Dorta, Antonio D. ; Thomas, Daniel ; Tojeiro, Rita ; Weiner, Benjamin ; Zehavi, Idit ; Olmstead, Matthew D. / The correlation between halo mass and stellar mass for the most massive galaxies in the universe. In: The Astrophysical Journal. 2017 ; Vol. 839, No. 2.

Bibtex

@article{fc12db274bff427a9450e0c74b66d3c4,
title = "The correlation between halo mass and stellar mass for the most massive galaxies in the universe",
abstract = "We present measurements of the clustering of galaxies as a function of their stellar mass in the Baryon Oscillation Spectroscopic Survey. We compare the clustering of samples using 12 different methods for estimating stellar mass, isolating the method that has the smallest scatter at fixed halo mass. In this test, the stellar mass estimate with the smallest errors yields the highest amplitude of clustering at fixed number density. We find that the PCA stellar masses of Chen etal (2012) clearly have the tightest correlation with halo mass. The PCA masses use the full galaxy spectrum, differentiating them from other estimates that only use optical photometric information. Using the PCA masses, we measure the large-scale bias as a function of Mgal for galaxies with logMgal>=11.4, correcting for incompleteness at the low-mass end of our measurements. Using the abundance-matching ansatz to connect dark matter halo mass to stellar mass, we construct theoretical models of b(Mgal) that match the same stellar mass function but have different amounts of scatter in stellar mass at fixed halo mass, sigma_logM. Using this approach, we find sigma_logM=0.18^{+0.01}_{-0.02}. This value includes both intrinsic scatter as well as random errors in the stellar masses. To partially remove the latter, we use repeated spectra to estimate statistical errors on the stellar masses, yielding an upper limit to the intrinsic scatter of 0.16 dex.",
keywords = "astro-ph.GA, astro-ph.CO, uploaded-in-3-months-elsewhere",
author = "Tinker, {Jeremy L.} and Brownstein, {Joel R.} and Hong Guo and Alexie Leauthaud and Claudia Maraston and Karen Masters and Montero-Dorta, {Antonio D.} and Daniel Thomas and Rita Tojeiro and Benjamin Weiner and Idit Zehavi and Olmstead, {Matthew D.}",
year = "2017",
month = "4",
day = "24",
doi = "10.3847/1538-4357/aa6845",
language = "English",
volume = "839",
journal = "The Astrophysical Journal",
issn = "0004-637X",
publisher = "IOP Publishing",
number = "2",

}

RIS

TY - JOUR

T1 - The correlation between halo mass and stellar mass for the most massive galaxies in the universe

AU - Tinker, Jeremy L.

AU - Brownstein, Joel R.

AU - Guo, Hong

AU - Leauthaud, Alexie

AU - Maraston, Claudia

AU - Masters, Karen

AU - Montero-Dorta, Antonio D.

AU - Thomas, Daniel

AU - Tojeiro, Rita

AU - Weiner, Benjamin

AU - Zehavi, Idit

AU - Olmstead, Matthew D.

PY - 2017/4/24

Y1 - 2017/4/24

N2 - We present measurements of the clustering of galaxies as a function of their stellar mass in the Baryon Oscillation Spectroscopic Survey. We compare the clustering of samples using 12 different methods for estimating stellar mass, isolating the method that has the smallest scatter at fixed halo mass. In this test, the stellar mass estimate with the smallest errors yields the highest amplitude of clustering at fixed number density. We find that the PCA stellar masses of Chen etal (2012) clearly have the tightest correlation with halo mass. The PCA masses use the full galaxy spectrum, differentiating them from other estimates that only use optical photometric information. Using the PCA masses, we measure the large-scale bias as a function of Mgal for galaxies with logMgal>=11.4, correcting for incompleteness at the low-mass end of our measurements. Using the abundance-matching ansatz to connect dark matter halo mass to stellar mass, we construct theoretical models of b(Mgal) that match the same stellar mass function but have different amounts of scatter in stellar mass at fixed halo mass, sigma_logM. Using this approach, we find sigma_logM=0.18^{+0.01}_{-0.02}. This value includes both intrinsic scatter as well as random errors in the stellar masses. To partially remove the latter, we use repeated spectra to estimate statistical errors on the stellar masses, yielding an upper limit to the intrinsic scatter of 0.16 dex.

AB - We present measurements of the clustering of galaxies as a function of their stellar mass in the Baryon Oscillation Spectroscopic Survey. We compare the clustering of samples using 12 different methods for estimating stellar mass, isolating the method that has the smallest scatter at fixed halo mass. In this test, the stellar mass estimate with the smallest errors yields the highest amplitude of clustering at fixed number density. We find that the PCA stellar masses of Chen etal (2012) clearly have the tightest correlation with halo mass. The PCA masses use the full galaxy spectrum, differentiating them from other estimates that only use optical photometric information. Using the PCA masses, we measure the large-scale bias as a function of Mgal for galaxies with logMgal>=11.4, correcting for incompleteness at the low-mass end of our measurements. Using the abundance-matching ansatz to connect dark matter halo mass to stellar mass, we construct theoretical models of b(Mgal) that match the same stellar mass function but have different amounts of scatter in stellar mass at fixed halo mass, sigma_logM. Using this approach, we find sigma_logM=0.18^{+0.01}_{-0.02}. This value includes both intrinsic scatter as well as random errors in the stellar masses. To partially remove the latter, we use repeated spectra to estimate statistical errors on the stellar masses, yielding an upper limit to the intrinsic scatter of 0.16 dex.

KW - astro-ph.GA

KW - astro-ph.CO

KW - uploaded-in-3-months-elsewhere

UR - https://research-repository.st-andrews.ac.uk/handle/10023/10951

U2 - 10.3847/1538-4357/aa6845

DO - 10.3847/1538-4357/aa6845

M3 - Article

VL - 839

JO - The Astrophysical Journal

JF - The Astrophysical Journal

SN - 0004-637X

IS - 2

M1 - 121

ER -

ID: 4277881