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The effects of compression garments on stability and lower limb kinematics during a forward lunge

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The effects of compression garments on stability and lower limb kinematics during a forward lunge. / Angelakos, Ioannis; Mills, Chris; O'Halloran, Joseph.

In: Journal of Human Kinetics, Vol. 71, No. 1, 31.01.2020, p. 59-68.

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@article{7c2f2cc3df1041ca833d0650cc533d9e,
title = "The effects of compression garments on stability and lower limb kinematics during a forward lunge",
abstract = "Compression garments have been used to minimise injury risk, through improvements in stability and joint positioning; yet, it is unclear whether there is an optimal length or tightness of these garments that may maximise observed benefits. This study measured the effect of three different garment types, at two different tightness levels, on lower extremity stability and alignment during a forward lunge movement. Sixteen healthy adults (7 female, 9 male; 24.3 ± 2.9 years) were recruited as participants. Stability of the lead foot, as well as lower body joint kinematics, were recorded using an Oqus 12-camera system, surrounding participants as they executed three forward lunges onto a Matscan pressure mat under seven compression conditions (Control, Light/Heavy Calf, Light/Heavy Socks, Light/Heavy Leggings). Mean minimum time-toboundary (mmTtB) (derived from centre of pressure measures) and frontal plane kinematics (lateral pelvic tilt, knee valgus, ankle inversion/eversion) were used to assess the effect of garment tightness and length on lunge stability and joint alignment, respectively. A significant effect of tightness on mmTtB was observed (F(1,105) = 8.192; p = .005, η2 = .072), with Heavy garments eliciting longer mmTtB compared to their corresponding Light (-.18 ± .06 s; p = .015) or Control (-.28 ± .09 s; p = .007) conditions. No significant effects of garment tightness or length on lower body kinematics were evident. The results of this study suggest stability during a forward lunge is improved through the use of tight-fitted compression garments. ",
keywords = "time-to-boundary, proprioception, injury, joint alignment",
author = "Ioannis Angelakos and Chris Mills and Joseph O'Halloran",
year = "2020",
month = jan,
day = "31",
doi = "10.2478/hukin-2019-0074",
language = "English",
volume = "71",
pages = "59--68",
journal = "Journal of Human Kinetics",
issn = "1640-5544",
publisher = "Polish Academy of Science, Committee of Physical Culture",
number = "1",

}

RIS

TY - JOUR

T1 - The effects of compression garments on stability and lower limb kinematics during a forward lunge

AU - Angelakos, Ioannis

AU - Mills, Chris

AU - O'Halloran, Joseph

PY - 2020/1/31

Y1 - 2020/1/31

N2 - Compression garments have been used to minimise injury risk, through improvements in stability and joint positioning; yet, it is unclear whether there is an optimal length or tightness of these garments that may maximise observed benefits. This study measured the effect of three different garment types, at two different tightness levels, on lower extremity stability and alignment during a forward lunge movement. Sixteen healthy adults (7 female, 9 male; 24.3 ± 2.9 years) were recruited as participants. Stability of the lead foot, as well as lower body joint kinematics, were recorded using an Oqus 12-camera system, surrounding participants as they executed three forward lunges onto a Matscan pressure mat under seven compression conditions (Control, Light/Heavy Calf, Light/Heavy Socks, Light/Heavy Leggings). Mean minimum time-toboundary (mmTtB) (derived from centre of pressure measures) and frontal plane kinematics (lateral pelvic tilt, knee valgus, ankle inversion/eversion) were used to assess the effect of garment tightness and length on lunge stability and joint alignment, respectively. A significant effect of tightness on mmTtB was observed (F(1,105) = 8.192; p = .005, η2 = .072), with Heavy garments eliciting longer mmTtB compared to their corresponding Light (-.18 ± .06 s; p = .015) or Control (-.28 ± .09 s; p = .007) conditions. No significant effects of garment tightness or length on lower body kinematics were evident. The results of this study suggest stability during a forward lunge is improved through the use of tight-fitted compression garments.

AB - Compression garments have been used to minimise injury risk, through improvements in stability and joint positioning; yet, it is unclear whether there is an optimal length or tightness of these garments that may maximise observed benefits. This study measured the effect of three different garment types, at two different tightness levels, on lower extremity stability and alignment during a forward lunge movement. Sixteen healthy adults (7 female, 9 male; 24.3 ± 2.9 years) were recruited as participants. Stability of the lead foot, as well as lower body joint kinematics, were recorded using an Oqus 12-camera system, surrounding participants as they executed three forward lunges onto a Matscan pressure mat under seven compression conditions (Control, Light/Heavy Calf, Light/Heavy Socks, Light/Heavy Leggings). Mean minimum time-toboundary (mmTtB) (derived from centre of pressure measures) and frontal plane kinematics (lateral pelvic tilt, knee valgus, ankle inversion/eversion) were used to assess the effect of garment tightness and length on lunge stability and joint alignment, respectively. A significant effect of tightness on mmTtB was observed (F(1,105) = 8.192; p = .005, η2 = .072), with Heavy garments eliciting longer mmTtB compared to their corresponding Light (-.18 ± .06 s; p = .015) or Control (-.28 ± .09 s; p = .007) conditions. No significant effects of garment tightness or length on lower body kinematics were evident. The results of this study suggest stability during a forward lunge is improved through the use of tight-fitted compression garments.

KW - time-to-boundary

KW - proprioception

KW - injury

KW - joint alignment

U2 - 10.2478/hukin-2019-0074

DO - 10.2478/hukin-2019-0074

M3 - Article

VL - 71

SP - 59

EP - 68

JO - Journal of Human Kinetics

JF - Journal of Human Kinetics

SN - 1640-5544

IS - 1

ER -

ID: 16117933