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The impact of HRM, perceived employability, and job insecurity on self-initiated expatriates’ adjustment to the host country

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Career-oriented human resource management (HRM) practices are likely to facilitate self-initiated expatriates’ adjustment to the host country. This may happen because these practices could boost one's professional development and lead to different types of career security (job security and employment security), which were probably missing in their home country and may be important elements to adjust to the host country. Quantitative survey data from 234 Portuguese self-initiated expatriates in the United Kingdom were analyzed via structural equation modeling. Results demonstrate that career-oriented HRM practices are positively related to adjustment to the host country. These practices are also positively related to perceived job security and perceived internal employability, an indicator of employment security, but these latter variables were not significantly related to adjustment to the host country. These results suggest that career-oriented HRM practices are indeed relevant for the adjustment of self-initiated expatriates, but not necessarily because they increase career security. Further analyses positively correlated adjustment to time intended to remain in the host country.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)861-871
Number of pages11
JournalThunderbird International Business Review
Volume60
Issue number6
Early online date6 Jul 2017
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Nov 2018

Documents

  • The impact of HRM post-print

    Rights statement: This is the peer reviewed version of the following article: Fontinha R, De Cuyper N, Williams S, Scott P. The impact of HRM, perceived employability, and job insecurity on self-initiated expatriates’ adjustment to the host country. Thunderbird International Business Review. 2017., which has been published in final form at https://doi.org/10.1002/tie.21919. This article may be used for non-commercial purposes in accordance with Wiley Terms and Conditions for Self-Archiving.

    Accepted author manuscript (Post-print), 508 KB, PDF document

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