Skip to content
Back to outputs

The police and fraud investigation and the case for a nationalised solution in the United Kingdom

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Standard

The police and fraud investigation and the case for a nationalised solution in the United Kingdom. / Brooks, G.; Button, Mark.

In: The Police Journal, Vol. 84, No. 4, 2011, p. 305-319.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Harvard

APA

Vancouver

Author

Brooks, G. ; Button, Mark. / The police and fraud investigation and the case for a nationalised solution in the United Kingdom. In: The Police Journal. 2011 ; Vol. 84, No. 4. pp. 305-319.

Bibtex

@article{7cf849bb06ce443e9cbc16b8a8fddbbd,
title = "The police and fraud investigation and the case for a nationalised solution in the United Kingdom",
abstract = "Fraud is not treated as a major criminal concern by most UK police forces unless linked to organised crime or terrorism. This is perhaps understandable since the police have limited resources available to deal with such a complex crime. However, the consequences of the Fraud Review and Fraud Act 2006 are likely to lead to more frauds being reported to the police and more victims seeking {\textquoteleft}justice{\textquoteright}. This might increase the pressure on the police to respond to the crime and reassure victims. These victims could be individuals, national or international organisations putting pressure on the police to exercise their powers of arrest and search or interview a suspect under caution. This article presents findings from a series of interviews with staff in the public and private sectors focused upon fraud, as well as other data on their views about their relationship with the police. From this research the article argues for a new nationalised fraud agency to cope better with the problem of fraud.",
author = "G. Brooks and Mark Button",
year = "2011",
doi = "10.1350/pojo.2011.84.4.559",
language = "English",
volume = "84",
pages = "305--319",
journal = "The Police Journal",
issn = "0032-258X",
number = "4",

}

RIS

TY - JOUR

T1 - The police and fraud investigation and the case for a nationalised solution in the United Kingdom

AU - Brooks, G.

AU - Button, Mark

PY - 2011

Y1 - 2011

N2 - Fraud is not treated as a major criminal concern by most UK police forces unless linked to organised crime or terrorism. This is perhaps understandable since the police have limited resources available to deal with such a complex crime. However, the consequences of the Fraud Review and Fraud Act 2006 are likely to lead to more frauds being reported to the police and more victims seeking ‘justice’. This might increase the pressure on the police to respond to the crime and reassure victims. These victims could be individuals, national or international organisations putting pressure on the police to exercise their powers of arrest and search or interview a suspect under caution. This article presents findings from a series of interviews with staff in the public and private sectors focused upon fraud, as well as other data on their views about their relationship with the police. From this research the article argues for a new nationalised fraud agency to cope better with the problem of fraud.

AB - Fraud is not treated as a major criminal concern by most UK police forces unless linked to organised crime or terrorism. This is perhaps understandable since the police have limited resources available to deal with such a complex crime. However, the consequences of the Fraud Review and Fraud Act 2006 are likely to lead to more frauds being reported to the police and more victims seeking ‘justice’. This might increase the pressure on the police to respond to the crime and reassure victims. These victims could be individuals, national or international organisations putting pressure on the police to exercise their powers of arrest and search or interview a suspect under caution. This article presents findings from a series of interviews with staff in the public and private sectors focused upon fraud, as well as other data on their views about their relationship with the police. From this research the article argues for a new nationalised fraud agency to cope better with the problem of fraud.

U2 - 10.1350/pojo.2011.84.4.559

DO - 10.1350/pojo.2011.84.4.559

M3 - Article

VL - 84

SP - 305

EP - 319

JO - The Police Journal

JF - The Police Journal

SN - 0032-258X

IS - 4

ER -

ID: 185260