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The prediction of thriving in elite sport: a prospective examination of the role of psychological need satisfaction, challenge appraisal, and salivary biomarkers

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The prediction of thriving in elite sport : a prospective examination of the role of psychological need satisfaction, challenge appraisal, and salivary biomarkers. / Brown, Daniel J.; Arnold, Rachel; Standage, Martyn; Turner, James E.; Fletcher, David.

In: Journal of Science and Medicine in Sport, Vol. 0, 0, 08.10.2020, p. 0.

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Brown, Daniel J. ; Arnold, Rachel ; Standage, Martyn ; Turner, James E. ; Fletcher, David. / The prediction of thriving in elite sport : a prospective examination of the role of psychological need satisfaction, challenge appraisal, and salivary biomarkers. In: Journal of Science and Medicine in Sport. 2020 ; Vol. 0. pp. 0.

Bibtex

@article{d058e3f4b4d649a4b9101ef35c541b86,
title = "The prediction of thriving in elite sport: a prospective examination of the role of psychological need satisfaction, challenge appraisal, and salivary biomarkers",
abstract = "Objectives - To examine (i) whether levels of, and changes in, athletes{\textquoteright} basic psychological need satisfaction (BPNS) and challenge appraisals predicted in-match thriving; and (ii) if salivary biomarkers could be defined that were related to thriving.Design - Prospective study design.Method - Fifty-one elite male hockey players ( M age = 24.94 years, SD age = 4.73) completed questionnaires measuring their BPNS and challenge appraisals on seven consecutive days prior to a competitive match, as well as providing saliva samples immediately on waking, and then + 0.5, + 3, and + 5.25 hours on the day of the match. Saliva was assayed for catabolic (i.e., cortisol) and anabolic (i.e., dehydroepiandrosterone [DHEA]) hormones. In-match thriving was assessed retrospectively using measures of subjective performance and well-being.Results - Latent growth curve modelling showed pre-match levels of BPNS and challenge appraisals to positively predict thriving. Although not statistically significant, small and moderate negative associations were found for thriving with cortisol concentration (+ 5.25 hours sample) and total cortisol exposure across the morning of the match, respectively. DHEA concentration shared a small positive, yet nonsignificant, association with thriving.Conclusions - Athletes{\textquoteright} pre-match levels of BPNS and challenge appraisal predict inmatch thriving; thus, offering potential mechanisms through which both high-level performance and the experience of well-being can be facilitated. Furthermore, associations suggest that total cortisol exposure across the morning of the match, and cortisol and DHEA levels in pre-match samples may offer sport science and sports medicine practitioners potential biomarkers for thriving. Future research is required to substantiate this initial finding.",
keywords = "cortisol, dehydroepiandrosterone, Monte Carlo power calculations, performance, thrive, well-being",
author = "Brown, {Daniel J.} and Rachel Arnold and Martyn Standage and Turner, {James E.} and David Fletcher",
year = "2020",
month = oct,
day = "8",
doi = "10.1016/j.jsams.2020.09.019",
language = "English",
volume = "0",
pages = "0",
journal = "Journal of Science and Medicine in Sport",
issn = "1440-2440",
publisher = "Elsevier BV",

}

RIS

TY - JOUR

T1 - The prediction of thriving in elite sport

T2 - a prospective examination of the role of psychological need satisfaction, challenge appraisal, and salivary biomarkers

AU - Brown, Daniel J.

AU - Arnold, Rachel

AU - Standage, Martyn

AU - Turner, James E.

AU - Fletcher, David

PY - 2020/10/8

Y1 - 2020/10/8

N2 - Objectives - To examine (i) whether levels of, and changes in, athletes’ basic psychological need satisfaction (BPNS) and challenge appraisals predicted in-match thriving; and (ii) if salivary biomarkers could be defined that were related to thriving.Design - Prospective study design.Method - Fifty-one elite male hockey players ( M age = 24.94 years, SD age = 4.73) completed questionnaires measuring their BPNS and challenge appraisals on seven consecutive days prior to a competitive match, as well as providing saliva samples immediately on waking, and then + 0.5, + 3, and + 5.25 hours on the day of the match. Saliva was assayed for catabolic (i.e., cortisol) and anabolic (i.e., dehydroepiandrosterone [DHEA]) hormones. In-match thriving was assessed retrospectively using measures of subjective performance and well-being.Results - Latent growth curve modelling showed pre-match levels of BPNS and challenge appraisals to positively predict thriving. Although not statistically significant, small and moderate negative associations were found for thriving with cortisol concentration (+ 5.25 hours sample) and total cortisol exposure across the morning of the match, respectively. DHEA concentration shared a small positive, yet nonsignificant, association with thriving.Conclusions - Athletes’ pre-match levels of BPNS and challenge appraisal predict inmatch thriving; thus, offering potential mechanisms through which both high-level performance and the experience of well-being can be facilitated. Furthermore, associations suggest that total cortisol exposure across the morning of the match, and cortisol and DHEA levels in pre-match samples may offer sport science and sports medicine practitioners potential biomarkers for thriving. Future research is required to substantiate this initial finding.

AB - Objectives - To examine (i) whether levels of, and changes in, athletes’ basic psychological need satisfaction (BPNS) and challenge appraisals predicted in-match thriving; and (ii) if salivary biomarkers could be defined that were related to thriving.Design - Prospective study design.Method - Fifty-one elite male hockey players ( M age = 24.94 years, SD age = 4.73) completed questionnaires measuring their BPNS and challenge appraisals on seven consecutive days prior to a competitive match, as well as providing saliva samples immediately on waking, and then + 0.5, + 3, and + 5.25 hours on the day of the match. Saliva was assayed for catabolic (i.e., cortisol) and anabolic (i.e., dehydroepiandrosterone [DHEA]) hormones. In-match thriving was assessed retrospectively using measures of subjective performance and well-being.Results - Latent growth curve modelling showed pre-match levels of BPNS and challenge appraisals to positively predict thriving. Although not statistically significant, small and moderate negative associations were found for thriving with cortisol concentration (+ 5.25 hours sample) and total cortisol exposure across the morning of the match, respectively. DHEA concentration shared a small positive, yet nonsignificant, association with thriving.Conclusions - Athletes’ pre-match levels of BPNS and challenge appraisal predict inmatch thriving; thus, offering potential mechanisms through which both high-level performance and the experience of well-being can be facilitated. Furthermore, associations suggest that total cortisol exposure across the morning of the match, and cortisol and DHEA levels in pre-match samples may offer sport science and sports medicine practitioners potential biomarkers for thriving. Future research is required to substantiate this initial finding.

KW - cortisol

KW - dehydroepiandrosterone

KW - Monte Carlo power calculations

KW - performance

KW - thrive

KW - well-being

U2 - 10.1016/j.jsams.2020.09.019

DO - 10.1016/j.jsams.2020.09.019

M3 - Article

VL - 0

SP - 0

JO - Journal of Science and Medicine in Sport

JF - Journal of Science and Medicine in Sport

SN - 1440-2440

M1 - 0

ER -

ID: 22580120