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The Private Security Industry Act 2001 and the security management gap in the United Kingdom

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The Private Security Industry Act 2001 and the security management gap in the United Kingdom. / Button, Mark.

In: Security Journal, Vol. 24, No. 2, 10.2009, p. 118-132.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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@article{4502d3db99de41a68cc396fa5c20013d,
title = "The Private Security Industry Act 2001 and the security management gap in the United Kingdom",
abstract = "The passing of the Private Security Industry Act 2001 introduced regulation to much of the private security industry in England and Wales. This legislation has, however, only provided partial regulation, with several areas of the private security industry subject to no or limited control. This article examines the gaps in the regulation of those who manage security departments and companies. It illustrates some of the weaknesses in not fully regulating the management of security and how this gap may have implications for the ultimate success of the legislation in transforming this sector, particularly in failing to change the culture of the security industry. The article concludes with a model for regulating security managers, which could be used to enhance the UK regulatory system, but which could also be utilised in other jurisdictions where there is no or minimal regulation of security managers.",
author = "Mark Button",
year = "2009",
month = oct,
doi = "10.1057/sj.2009.13",
language = "English",
volume = "24",
pages = "118--132",
journal = "Security Journal",
issn = "0955-1662",
publisher = "Palgrave Macmillan Ltd.",
number = "2",

}

RIS

TY - JOUR

T1 - The Private Security Industry Act 2001 and the security management gap in the United Kingdom

AU - Button, Mark

PY - 2009/10

Y1 - 2009/10

N2 - The passing of the Private Security Industry Act 2001 introduced regulation to much of the private security industry in England and Wales. This legislation has, however, only provided partial regulation, with several areas of the private security industry subject to no or limited control. This article examines the gaps in the regulation of those who manage security departments and companies. It illustrates some of the weaknesses in not fully regulating the management of security and how this gap may have implications for the ultimate success of the legislation in transforming this sector, particularly in failing to change the culture of the security industry. The article concludes with a model for regulating security managers, which could be used to enhance the UK regulatory system, but which could also be utilised in other jurisdictions where there is no or minimal regulation of security managers.

AB - The passing of the Private Security Industry Act 2001 introduced regulation to much of the private security industry in England and Wales. This legislation has, however, only provided partial regulation, with several areas of the private security industry subject to no or limited control. This article examines the gaps in the regulation of those who manage security departments and companies. It illustrates some of the weaknesses in not fully regulating the management of security and how this gap may have implications for the ultimate success of the legislation in transforming this sector, particularly in failing to change the culture of the security industry. The article concludes with a model for regulating security managers, which could be used to enhance the UK regulatory system, but which could also be utilised in other jurisdictions where there is no or minimal regulation of security managers.

U2 - 10.1057/sj.2009.13

DO - 10.1057/sj.2009.13

M3 - Article

VL - 24

SP - 118

EP - 132

JO - Security Journal

JF - Security Journal

SN - 0955-1662

IS - 2

ER -

ID: 67707