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The silent revolution: Austria's accession to the European Union

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingChapter (peer-reviewed)peer-review

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The silent revolution : Austria's accession to the European Union. / Kaiser, Wolfram.

Austrian Historical Memory and National Identity. ed. / Gunter Bischof; Anton Pelinka. Routledge, 2017. p. 135-162 (Contemporary Austrian Studies; Vol. 5).

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingChapter (peer-reviewed)peer-review

Harvard

Kaiser, W 2017, The silent revolution: Austria's accession to the European Union. in G Bischof & A Pelinka (eds), Austrian Historical Memory and National Identity. Contemporary Austrian Studies, vol. 5, Routledge, pp. 135-162. https://doi.org/10.4324/9781351315128-8

APA

Kaiser, W. (2017). The silent revolution: Austria's accession to the European Union. In G. Bischof, & A. Pelinka (Eds.), Austrian Historical Memory and National Identity (pp. 135-162). (Contemporary Austrian Studies; Vol. 5). Routledge. https://doi.org/10.4324/9781351315128-8

Vancouver

Kaiser W. The silent revolution: Austria's accession to the European Union. In Bischof G, Pelinka A, editors, Austrian Historical Memory and National Identity. Routledge. 2017. p. 135-162. (Contemporary Austrian Studies). https://doi.org/10.4324/9781351315128-8

Author

Kaiser, Wolfram. / The silent revolution : Austria's accession to the European Union. Austrian Historical Memory and National Identity. editor / Gunter Bischof ; Anton Pelinka. Routledge, 2017. pp. 135-162 (Contemporary Austrian Studies).

Bibtex

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title = "The silent revolution: Austria's accession to the European Union",
abstract = "The statement “Austria has always belonged to Europe” is banal in its reference to a common geographical space, but problematic, when made about Austria{\textquoteright}s policy towards West European integration since 1945. European Union (EU) membership has also had a significant impact on the center-periphery relationship in Austria. For a long time, accession to the EU seemed bound to result in a restructuring of the federal system of Austria which, because of the limited powers of the Lander, should appropriately be described as a decentralized unitary state. The institutions themselves and the institutional balance within the Austrian political system are also affected. Only one year after Austria{\textquoteright}s accession to the EU, the far-reaching consequences of EU membership, which even indirectly contributed to the breakdown of the grand coalition on 12 October 1995, are slowly becoming more apparent. At a time of a domestic crisis of orientation, the change amounts to a silent revolution.",
author = "Wolfram Kaiser",
year = "2017",
month = nov,
day = "29",
doi = "10.4324/9781351315128-8",
language = "English",
isbn = "9781138519091",
series = "Contemporary Austrian Studies",
publisher = "Routledge",
pages = "135--162",
editor = "Gunter Bischof and Anton Pelinka",
booktitle = "Austrian Historical Memory and National Identity",

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RIS

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N2 - The statement “Austria has always belonged to Europe” is banal in its reference to a common geographical space, but problematic, when made about Austria’s policy towards West European integration since 1945. European Union (EU) membership has also had a significant impact on the center-periphery relationship in Austria. For a long time, accession to the EU seemed bound to result in a restructuring of the federal system of Austria which, because of the limited powers of the Lander, should appropriately be described as a decentralized unitary state. The institutions themselves and the institutional balance within the Austrian political system are also affected. Only one year after Austria’s accession to the EU, the far-reaching consequences of EU membership, which even indirectly contributed to the breakdown of the grand coalition on 12 October 1995, are slowly becoming more apparent. At a time of a domestic crisis of orientation, the change amounts to a silent revolution.

AB - The statement “Austria has always belonged to Europe” is banal in its reference to a common geographical space, but problematic, when made about Austria’s policy towards West European integration since 1945. European Union (EU) membership has also had a significant impact on the center-periphery relationship in Austria. For a long time, accession to the EU seemed bound to result in a restructuring of the federal system of Austria which, because of the limited powers of the Lander, should appropriately be described as a decentralized unitary state. The institutions themselves and the institutional balance within the Austrian political system are also affected. Only one year after Austria’s accession to the EU, the far-reaching consequences of EU membership, which even indirectly contributed to the breakdown of the grand coalition on 12 October 1995, are slowly becoming more apparent. At a time of a domestic crisis of orientation, the change amounts to a silent revolution.

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ID: 22663094