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Very low frequency EEG oscillations and the resting brain in young adults: a preliminary study of localisation, stability and association with symptoms of inattention

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Very low frequency EEG oscillations and the resting brain in young adults : a preliminary study of localisation, stability and association with symptoms of inattention. / Helps, S.; James, C.; Debener, S.; Karl, A.; Sonuga-Barke, E. J S.

In: Journal of Neural Transmission, Vol. 115, No. 2, 02.2008, p. 279-285.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

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Helps, S. ; James, C. ; Debener, S. ; Karl, A. ; Sonuga-Barke, E. J S. / Very low frequency EEG oscillations and the resting brain in young adults : a preliminary study of localisation, stability and association with symptoms of inattention. In: Journal of Neural Transmission. 2008 ; Vol. 115, No. 2. pp. 279-285.

Bibtex

@article{fc8b7d5177a8409bb83b7118b7edfe8b,
title = "Very low frequency EEG oscillations and the resting brain in young adults: a preliminary study of localisation, stability and association with symptoms of inattention",
abstract = "Background - Spontaneous very low frequency oscillations (VLFO: <0.2Hz) in functional magnetic-resonance imaging are proposed to identify a default-mode network of resting brain activity. Activity in this network has been related to lapses of attention during goal-directed tasks and may provide a basis for ADHD. This study assessed the relation between scalp-recorded EEG VLFO at rest and ADHD. Methods - 13 young adults with high- and 11 with low self-ratings of ADHD participated. Direct current EEG was recorded during a five minute rest session and was retested after approximately 1 week. Results - A consistent and temporally stable pattern of VLFOs was observed across specific scalp regions in low-ADHD participants. High-ADHD participants had less VLFO power across these locations, especially where inattention self-ratings were high. Inattention was not related to VLFO power in other locations. Discussion - Initial evidence is provided for a pattern of VLFOs at rest which is associated with inattention symptoms.",
keywords = "Attention deficit/hyperactivity disorder, Default mode, Direct current EEG, Low frequency oscillations, Resting state, Spontaneous neuronal activity, Young adults",
author = "S. Helps and C. James and S. Debener and A. Karl and Sonuga-Barke, {E. J S}",
year = "2008",
month = feb,
doi = "10.1007/s00702-007-0825-2",
language = "English",
volume = "115",
pages = "279--285",
journal = "Journal of Neural Transmission",
issn = "0300-9564",
publisher = "Springer Verlag",
number = "2",

}

RIS

TY - JOUR

T1 - Very low frequency EEG oscillations and the resting brain in young adults

T2 - a preliminary study of localisation, stability and association with symptoms of inattention

AU - Helps, S.

AU - James, C.

AU - Debener, S.

AU - Karl, A.

AU - Sonuga-Barke, E. J S

PY - 2008/2

Y1 - 2008/2

N2 - Background - Spontaneous very low frequency oscillations (VLFO: <0.2Hz) in functional magnetic-resonance imaging are proposed to identify a default-mode network of resting brain activity. Activity in this network has been related to lapses of attention during goal-directed tasks and may provide a basis for ADHD. This study assessed the relation between scalp-recorded EEG VLFO at rest and ADHD. Methods - 13 young adults with high- and 11 with low self-ratings of ADHD participated. Direct current EEG was recorded during a five minute rest session and was retested after approximately 1 week. Results - A consistent and temporally stable pattern of VLFOs was observed across specific scalp regions in low-ADHD participants. High-ADHD participants had less VLFO power across these locations, especially where inattention self-ratings were high. Inattention was not related to VLFO power in other locations. Discussion - Initial evidence is provided for a pattern of VLFOs at rest which is associated with inattention symptoms.

AB - Background - Spontaneous very low frequency oscillations (VLFO: <0.2Hz) in functional magnetic-resonance imaging are proposed to identify a default-mode network of resting brain activity. Activity in this network has been related to lapses of attention during goal-directed tasks and may provide a basis for ADHD. This study assessed the relation between scalp-recorded EEG VLFO at rest and ADHD. Methods - 13 young adults with high- and 11 with low self-ratings of ADHD participated. Direct current EEG was recorded during a five minute rest session and was retested after approximately 1 week. Results - A consistent and temporally stable pattern of VLFOs was observed across specific scalp regions in low-ADHD participants. High-ADHD participants had less VLFO power across these locations, especially where inattention self-ratings were high. Inattention was not related to VLFO power in other locations. Discussion - Initial evidence is provided for a pattern of VLFOs at rest which is associated with inattention symptoms.

KW - Attention deficit/hyperactivity disorder

KW - Default mode

KW - Direct current EEG

KW - Low frequency oscillations

KW - Resting state

KW - Spontaneous neuronal activity

KW - Young adults

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=39549105210&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.1007/s00702-007-0825-2

DO - 10.1007/s00702-007-0825-2

M3 - Article

C2 - 17994187

AN - SCOPUS:39549105210

VL - 115

SP - 279

EP - 285

JO - Journal of Neural Transmission

JF - Journal of Neural Transmission

SN - 0300-9564

IS - 2

ER -

ID: 3072490