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Why some organisations prefer in-house to contract security staff

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingChapter (peer-reviewed)

Standard

Why some organisations prefer in-house to contract security staff. / Button, Mark; George, Bruce.

Crime at Work: Studies in Security and Crime Prevention. ed. / Martin Gill. Vol. 1 Leicester : Perpetuity Press., 1994. p. 210-224.

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingChapter (peer-reviewed)

Harvard

Button, M & George, B 1994, Why some organisations prefer in-house to contract security staff. in M Gill (ed.), Crime at Work: Studies in Security and Crime Prevention. vol. 1, Perpetuity Press., Leicester, pp. 210-224.

APA

Button, M., & George, B. (1994). Why some organisations prefer in-house to contract security staff. In M. Gill (Ed.), Crime at Work: Studies in Security and Crime Prevention (Vol. 1, pp. 210-224). Perpetuity Press..

Vancouver

Button M, George B. Why some organisations prefer in-house to contract security staff. In Gill M, editor, Crime at Work: Studies in Security and Crime Prevention. Vol. 1. Leicester: Perpetuity Press. 1994. p. 210-224

Author

Button, Mark ; George, Bruce. / Why some organisations prefer in-house to contract security staff. Crime at Work: Studies in Security and Crime Prevention. editor / Martin Gill. Vol. 1 Leicester : Perpetuity Press., 1994. pp. 210-224

Bibtex

@inbook{55398ff0e45c4f8fa9c33f872ab00601,
title = "Why some organisations prefer in-house to contract security staff",
abstract = "Many organisations' insurance requirements and crime prevention strategies involve the use of manned security services, a generic term covering a range of activities including patrolling, guarding, access control, protection of cash in transit services etc. These organisations have a choice of employing a contract security company, recruiting in-house security officers or using a combination of the two. According to the Security Industry Training Organisation(SITO), in-house manned security services could account for up to 40 per cent of the sector. Despite this there has been very little research into such services yet perceptions of each differ quite markedly. ",
author = "Mark Button and Bruce George",
year = "1994",
language = "English",
volume = "1",
pages = "210--224",
editor = "Martin Gill",
booktitle = "Crime at Work",
publisher = "Perpetuity Press.",

}

RIS

TY - CHAP

T1 - Why some organisations prefer in-house to contract security staff

AU - Button, Mark

AU - George, Bruce

PY - 1994

Y1 - 1994

N2 - Many organisations' insurance requirements and crime prevention strategies involve the use of manned security services, a generic term covering a range of activities including patrolling, guarding, access control, protection of cash in transit services etc. These organisations have a choice of employing a contract security company, recruiting in-house security officers or using a combination of the two. According to the Security Industry Training Organisation(SITO), in-house manned security services could account for up to 40 per cent of the sector. Despite this there has been very little research into such services yet perceptions of each differ quite markedly.

AB - Many organisations' insurance requirements and crime prevention strategies involve the use of manned security services, a generic term covering a range of activities including patrolling, guarding, access control, protection of cash in transit services etc. These organisations have a choice of employing a contract security company, recruiting in-house security officers or using a combination of the two. According to the Security Industry Training Organisation(SITO), in-house manned security services could account for up to 40 per cent of the sector. Despite this there has been very little research into such services yet perceptions of each differ quite markedly.

UR - https://beta.companieshouse.gov.uk/company/03167725

M3 - Chapter (peer-reviewed)

VL - 1

SP - 210

EP - 224

BT - Crime at Work

A2 - Gill, Martin

PB - Perpetuity Press.

CY - Leicester

ER -

ID: 239989